1. Marie Domingo
  2. Senior Producer, SciGirls
  3. Latina SciGirls: Promoting Middle School-Age Hispanic Girls' Positive STEM Identity Development
  4. http://www.scigirlsconnect.org/
  5. TPT Twin Cities Public Television
  1. Gina Reis
  2. Producer, SciGirls
  3. Latina SciGirls: Promoting Middle School-Age Hispanic Girls' Positive STEM Identity Development
  4. http://www.scigirlsconnect.org/
  5. TPT Twin Cities Public Television
Public Discussion
  • Icon for: Marie Domingo

    Marie Domingo

    Lead Presenter
    May 13, 2019 | 08:06 a.m.

    Thanks for stopping by to view this video profile of Dr. Amelia Merced, a microscopist at the Institute of Neurobiology in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Amelia’s video is part of a larger series of role model videos, Latinas At Work, that aims to provide educators with short-form media showing Latina STEM professionals. Take a look and please share your thoughts. We welcome all comments, questions and feedback about our project!

  • Icon for: Steven McGee

    Steven McGee

    Researcher
    May 13, 2019 | 08:45 a.m.

    Great video. How are the videos used in Puerto Rico? These would be a great companion to our Schoolyard LTER program in El Yunque. 

  • Icon for: Marie Domingo

    Marie Domingo

    Lead Presenter
    May 13, 2019 | 12:54 p.m.

    Thanks for watching and commenting, Steven! I enjoyed watching your video and learning about the Schoolyard LTER program in El Yunque. It's powerful to see how engaging youth in hands-on recovery of El Yunque after Hurricane Maria has given students insight into the adaptability of the rainforest and allowed them to reflect on their own experiences of recovery and resilience. As Rita shared, the Latinas at Work series of 12 role model shorts are being used by outreach partners across the country, including Puerto Rico, and is freely available to all. In addition, both Dr. Merced and Dr. Grizelle González. a research ecologist at the International Institute of Tropical Forestry served as mentors for a SciGirls episode, Asombrosos Arboles (Terrific Trees), which premiered on PBS Kids in 2018. In this episode (filmed prior to Hurricane Maria) three girls from San Juan explore the benefits that big trees bring to their ecosystems, comparing trees in the rain forest and the city. All six episodes of SciGirls' Spanish-first season are available at http://www.scigirlsconnect.org. In case our partners in San Juan aren't familiar with your project, I'll share your presentation link with them as well!

  • Icon for: Brian Drayton

    Brian Drayton

    Researcher
    May 13, 2019 | 09:37 a.m.

    Enjoyed this video very much -- it does a really good job of giving a glimpse of the many parts of Dr. Merced's life and work — in the field, with students in her office/lab, and with student groups.  I have the same question as Steven McGee- how're these videos being used?

     

     
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    Gina Reis
  • Icon for: Rita Karl

    Rita Karl

    Managing Director of STEM Media & Education
    May 13, 2019 | 10:57 a.m.

    They have been used in Dr. Sandra Cruz-Pol's SciGirls summer camp at the University of Puerto Rico. They are freely available for other programs to use! The whole series is available here.

  • Icon for: Sarah Haavind

    Sarah Haavind

    Researcher
    May 14, 2019 | 07:44 p.m.

    Thanks Rita and quick question, are you sure the link above is the one you meant to use? It seems to go to just one video...I'd love to learn more about the whole series.

  • Icon for: Rita Karl

    Rita Karl

    Managing Director of STEM Media & Education
    May 13, 2019 | 11:00 a.m.

    Thanks! They are also used with SciGirls programs across the U.S. facilitated by educators working with young Latinas in STEM programs as motivational stories. The films were all made with an eye towards gender equitable strategies for engaging girls in STEM (The SciGirls Strategies) and best practices for role models (SciGirls Role Model Strategies).

  • Icon for: Karen Mutch-Jones

    Karen Mutch-Jones

    Facilitator
    May 13, 2019 | 11:12 a.m.

    I found the video, and Dr. Merced herself, so engaging.  I was eager to spend more time in the forest with her, so I'll be sure to watch Terrific Trees! Given that this work is based on research about the impact of role models, I was wondering if you are collecting any data, or even informal feedback, from girls who have watched these motivational stories?

  • Icon for: Gina Reis

    Gina Reis

    Co-Presenter
    May 13, 2019 | 11:25 a.m.

    I'm so glad you enjoyed the video! Filming with Dr. Merced was such a pleasure, as you can guess, because of her energy, knowledge, and true passion for what she does. I'm glad you're going to check out the Terrific Trees episode! You can find that, and the other 5 Latina SciGirls episodes, right here.

    As for your question about collecting data/feedback -- I'll let one of my colleagues who works more closely with that take the lead!

     
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    Sarah Haavind
  • Icon for: Rita Karl

    Rita Karl

    Managing Director of STEM Media & Education
    May 13, 2019 | 12:40 p.m.

    Yes, our evaluation by our external evaluator, Dr. Valerie Knight Williams looked at the use of these videos in SciGirls programs for Latinx girls and families as did our researcher ,Dr. Bradley McLain. These reports will be posted soon at http://www.scigirlsconnect.org/evaluations/

    The evaluation of the program (results pending) looked at the use and perceived value of SciGirls media featuring STEM professionals: Several partners used SciGirls episodes and SciGirls STEM profile videos in their programs. The partners generally found the episodes very valuable and the STEM profile videos moderately-to-very valuable.

    “Being able to show mentor videos in class improved my own knowledge in ways to address any barriers to STEM engagement. The videos were proof to my students that they CAN find a career that they love in a STEM related field.”

    The research study (results pending) shows that the theme STEM (or science being used to make the world a better place) was something highly tangible in the context of the program in Puerto Rico. 

    “It was important] to know that STEM careers and scientists work on issues that impact the community. … I learned that engineering is about community and solutions. I like that. I think science definitely contributes to better our world. … It makes me hopeful for the future and today. I learned how important is science when supporting our community bounce back from a hurricane impact before and after. I had not made that connection.” 

    “STEM professionals are needed to advance society and heal communities like Puerto Rico. … Now I understand the value of the scientific process and how important it is to know how to solve real life environmental problems.”

  • Icon for: Karen Mutch-Jones

    Karen Mutch-Jones

    Facilitator
    May 14, 2019 | 09:11 a.m.

    Thank you for letting me know where I can learn of your results in the future--I'll be sure to check back.  The quotes you shared suggest that the videos will be helpful to educators and girls alike, as well as resonate with members of the community.  There is much power in them!

  • Icon for: Noelia Báez Rodríguez

    Noelia Báez Rodríguez

    Education Coordinator
    May 14, 2019 | 09:56 a.m.

    Yes, 

    Congrats!! This is a great video! We are working with students on macro aspects of forests ecology of El Yunque. It will be really awesome to add this microscopic element to our program. 

  • Icon for: Marie Domingo

    Marie Domingo

    Lead Presenter
    May 14, 2019 | 03:19 p.m.

    Thanks for watching and sharing about your own work, Noelia! If any of the scientists who are working with students in your program would find it helpful, SciGirls has developed some strategies for making the most of role model opportunities that can be found at: SciGirls Role Model Strategies

  • Icon for: Daniel Morales-Doyle

    Daniel Morales-Doyle

    Facilitator
    May 14, 2019 | 06:21 p.m.

    This is an engaging and beautifully produced video. It made me want to learn more about the ways in which Dr. Merced's research and educational work are situated within and are also relevant beyond the unique Puerto Rican context. Your note about this video being produced before Hurricane Maria also made me curious about the interrelationships between the recovery of the island as a whole and the scientific work being done there. 

     
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    Gina Reis
  • Icon for: Marie Domingo

    Marie Domingo

    Lead Presenter
    May 15, 2019 | 12:47 p.m.

    Thanks for watching and commenting, Daniel! It’s been a privilege to be part of spotlighting Dr. Merced’s research and work engaging youth in science education, and to see how her story is inspiring more girls to harness the power of STEM, both in Puerto Rico and beyond. You raise an interesting question about the interrelation between the scientific community in Puerto Rico and the overall recovery of the island after Hurricane Maria.  Some of the scientists with whom we collaborated on the SciGirls Asombrosos Arboles episode are doing important work studying the health and recovery of the El Yunque rainforest and more information can be found at International Institute of Tropical Forestry.

     
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    Sarah Haavind
  • Icon for: Gina Reis

    Gina Reis

    Co-Presenter
    May 15, 2019 | 01:02 p.m.

    Following the release of the episode, we posted a follow up video on SciGirls social media channels of the 3 SciGirls' experience of Hurricane Maria and how it directly affected them, their school, and their community. It was powerful for us and I hope for viewers, too, to hear directly from our SciGirls about their experiences with this natural disaster. https://www.facebook.com/scigirlstv/videos/10160225057325788/ 

     
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    Sarah Haavind
  • Icon for: Sarah Haavind

    Sarah Haavind

    Facilitator
    May 16, 2019 | 08:06 a.m.

    Thanks for sharing this Gina, how cool. Is there any discussion of picking up on that idea and producing updates on your scientists and their work, storm related or not? The storm would be a clear incentive for follow up, but it makes me think that it might be interesting in other ways as well - following careers, how projects develop, what the life of a scientist/role model is like more deeply over time?

    These videos are so terrific! Thanks for sharing your work with the Showcase.

  • Icon for: Marie Domingo

    Marie Domingo

    Lead Presenter
    May 16, 2019 | 03:52 p.m.

    Thanks for your question! The SciGirls team does keep in touch with the girls and women featured in the TV episodes and role model video shorts. It’s wonderful to hear how they’re achieving their educational and professional goals and continuing to share their knowledge and experience by mentoring others. Our team has discussed ideas internally, like collecting follow up data, organizing a participant reunion, and producing update stories showing how careers and lives continue to evolve over time. However, we don't have concrete plans in place at this time.

     
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    Sarah Haavind
  • Icon for: Sarah Haavind

    Sarah Haavind

    Researcher
    May 14, 2019 | 07:57 p.m.

    What an engaging video! I look forward to the team's thoughts on Daniel's question above. I also enjoyed taking a look at the SciGirls Strategies guide Rita recommended earlier. Thanks for all the links. Are you continuing to gather new videos like Dr. Merced's? Or where are you in the project now? Thanks in advance.

  • Icon for: Marie Domingo

    Marie Domingo

    Lead Presenter
    May 16, 2019 | 03:20 p.m.

    Thanks for watching and contributing to the discussion, Sarah! We’re continuing to disseminate this season of Spanish-first TV episodes, role model videos and activity guides produced as part of the Latina SciGirls project, now in its third and final year. We’re also seeking opportunities to produce more profile videos in order to represent an even greater diversity of STEM interests, professional and educational experiences, cultural influences, geographic location, personal backstories, etc. and provide an even broader variety of potential affinity points for viewers.

    We would love to hear if any Showcase participants utilize role model media resources in their classrooms or youth programs. If so, do you think that more stories of younger role models (high school and college age women whose experiences have influenced their decision to pursue STEM learning pathways) would be useful, in addition to the profiles of women who are already working in STEM fields?

     
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    Sarah Haavind
  • Icon for: Bonny Ortiz

    Bonny Ortiz

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 20, 2019 | 07:43 p.m.

    Muchas felicidades! Es un muy buen video!

  • Icon for: Lucía Alcalá

    Lucía Alcalá

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 20, 2019 | 07:54 p.m.

    Great video, thanks for sharing her trajectory that will inspire new scientist! 

     

     

  • Further posting is closed as the showcase has ended.