1. Diana Franklin
  2. http://www.cs.uchicago.edu/~dmfranklin
  3. Director of Computer Science Education, Research Associate Professor
  4. Learning Trajectories for Everyday Computing (LTEC)
  5. http://everydaycomputing.org/
  6. University of Chicago, Univ of Chicago STEM Ed
  1. Maya Israel
  2. https://education.ufl.edu/faculty/israel-maya/
  3. Associate professor
  4. Learning Trajectories for Everyday Computing (LTEC)
  5. http://everydaycomputing.org/
  6. University of Florida
  1. Carla Strickland
  2. Digital Development Manager
  3. Learning Trajectories for Everyday Computing (LTEC)
  4. http://everydaycomputing.org/
  5. Univ of Chicago STEM Ed
Public Discussion
  • Icon for: Maya Israel

    Maya Israel

    Co-Presenter
    May 13, 2019 | 09:53 a.m.

    Thanks for checking out or video on the LTEC project. We just finished the second year of this project and will be doing a treatment/control study in the 2019-2020 academic year to learn to what extent the integrated CT + fractions lessons influence students' understanding of both fractions and the CT concepts embedded in this curriculum. 

     
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    Carla Strickland
    George Reese
  • Icon for: Sara Vogel

    Sara Vogel

    Graduate Student
    May 13, 2019 | 11:11 a.m.

    I love this project, especially how the UDL framework guides your planning for a real focus on equity.  I am also excited about the TIPP scaffold you shared there -- I can imagine that being helpful for teachers we work with. Are any of your resources open to the public yet?

    I would love to learn more about the flow charts that you displayed in the middle of the video -- what are those used for?

    Thanks again for sharing your work!

     
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    George Reese
    Carla Strickland
  • Icon for: Maya Israel

    Maya Israel

    Co-Presenter
    May 13, 2019 | 03:07 p.m.

    Hi Sarah. Thank you so much. We are really excited about these learning trajectories, lessons, and the focus on UDL in the lessons. You can find the learning trajectories on our website: http://everydaycomputing.org/public/visualization/ We will be working on the website this summer, so come back later this summer as well as you'll see additional resources as well. 

     
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    Carla Strickland
  • Icon for: Susan Jo Russell

    Susan Jo Russell

    Facilitator
    May 13, 2019 | 01:20 p.m.

    Hi, Thanks so much for sharing this video. I'm interested in your thinking about addressing the range of learners in a classroom, especially through using multiple means of representation and expression.  Could you give an example of how multiple means of representation and expression come into play in one of your activities? Thanks so much.

     
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    George Reese
    Carla Strickland
  • Icon for: Maya Israel

    Maya Israel

    Co-Presenter
    May 13, 2019 | 03:11 p.m.

    Hi Susan. Thank you so much. We use various representations including: using both physical manipulatives of the math concepts (e.g., fraction circles) with the virtual manipulatives in our Action Fraction lessons (e.g., virtual fraction circles that the students manipulate). We also scaffold the projects in various ways. The TIPP & SEE strategy has the students go through a metacognitive strategy of thinking about the program before using and manipulating it. Lastly, for the open-ended lessons, we have multiple ways of allowing students to demonstrate their understanding through "base" projects and extensions to those. We provide project planning sheets to the students that have them plan their projects and get feedback, and we also then also have a simplified version for students who may not be performing at grade-level. I also have a document that I've been working on with several colleagues around UDL in CS education more broadly. You can find it here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1gVKE_SSrvWd12NwhYMmg9k4u8dIfgr3TJRmHfos9XRs/edit 

     
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    Carla Strickland
    George Reese
  • Icon for: Denise Schultz

    Denise Schultz

    Facilitator
    May 13, 2019 | 09:14 p.m.

     Hi and thanks for sharing!  Like Sara, I too was curious about the learning trajectories / flow charts you showed in the video so thanks for sharing!  I love the idea of adding the process of debugging into the fraction unit to encourage students to inspect, explore, and modify.  I'm curious if you collected any data that showed students modifying their thinking about fractions when doing paper & pencil tasks like they did when engaged in the computer game like settings.

     
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    Jessica Hunt
    Carla Strickland
  • Icon for: Maya Israel

    Maya Israel

    Co-Presenter
    May 14, 2019 | 09:27 a.m.

    This is a great question. We are unfortunately not collecting data on shifting student understanding as part of this project, although I would LOVE to do that. It's more an issue of capacity than desire. We are doing some think-aloud protocols having students explain their understanding, as part of validating our items, but this is definitely not getting at the complexity of the question you raise.  At this point, given the limited research in this area, we are only looking to see whether exposure to these integrated lessons improve students understanding of fractions (conceptual and procedural understanding) as well as CT understanding. Hopefully in another project!

     
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    Carla Strickland
    Jessica Hunt
    Denise Schultz
  • Icon for: Maya Israel

    Maya Israel

    Co-Presenter
    May 14, 2019 | 09:30 a.m.

    If you are interested in seeing some of the lessons we have developed as part of LTEC-2, check them out here: https://www.canonlab.org/actionfractionslessons. These lessons have been piloted, and we will be making modifications based on the data collected this academic year, so come back at the end of summer as well as there will be some changes to the materials. That's what I love about this project: We're learning not only about the integration of CT + fractions, but we are also learning about how to present these to teachers in a manner that is manageable for teachers. 

     
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    Carla Strickland
  • May 14, 2019 | 10:06 a.m.

     Great to see UDL so thoughtfully combined with CT & math, Maya -- great work!

     
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    Carla Strickland
  • Icon for: Maya Israel

    Maya Israel

    Co-Presenter
    May 15, 2019 | 08:09 a.m.

    Thanks Jeremy. It's incredibly challenging and exciting to think about access, engagement, and flexible learning within this context. We will have a long way to go, but this is definitely a good start! 

     
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    Carla Strickland
  • Icon for: Beth Sappe

    Beth Sappe

    Facilitator
    May 14, 2019 | 11:58 a.m.

     Thanks for sharing this interesting program. I am excited to see a program that is connecting CS to the math standards.  It is so important that we integrate the computational thinking into our math classrooms and I am impressed with your lessons.How did you determine the 12 hours of instruction? Do you plan to also connect this to other curriculum resources in the future?  What types of professional learning have you been able to do with teachers so there is fidelity in implementation? 

    Thanks for sharing the lessons that were piloted.

     

     

     
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    Carla Strickland
  • Icon for: Carla Strickland

    Carla Strickland

    Co-Presenter
    May 15, 2019 | 02:07 a.m.

    Hi, Beth! Thank you for your great question(s). I'm Carla Strickland and have been leading the Curriculum Development and PD work for this phase of the LTEC project.

    To determine our approx. 12 hrs of instruction per grade level, we relied heavily on our curriculum development expertise and our knowledge of the CCSS for Math. Once we'd narrowed to the NF domain in grades 3 and 4, we decided an approximately once per week cadence during the Everyday Math fractions units would be manageable for teachers, which got us pretty close to that number. Our focus on the CT learning goals we wanted to cover from our Learning Trajectories (LTs) also affected the number, so once we picked the placement of our "anchor activities" we fleshed out from there —filling in activities on the other arrows of the LTs.

    We do hope to eventually expand to other domains of both the math and CT content, but that is beyond the scope of the current grant. Fingers crossed for future successful proposals.

    As for PD, we do 2–3 days in person, and provide online resources throughout the year of implementation. We carefully attend to both content and pedagogy by modeling instruction with our elementary teachers who are almost all completely new to the CS material. In fact, I'm currently prepping for lots of Summer PD, so if you or your colleagues are in the Chicagoland area, you are welcome to experience it firsthand! Please see our website for details: https://www.canonlab.org/ltec-2-pd

    Fidelity is an important issue, but we tackle the brunt of this in our lesson design. The lesson layout and features are clear and familiar to teachers, so the modeling in PD just helps them hone in on how the new CS/CT content may adjust their classroom context and practice. We also encourage teachers to network with us and each other for implementation support throughout the year, which continues to positively impact fidelity.

    Thanks again for your interest!

  • Icon for: Beth Sappe

    Beth Sappe

    Facilitator
    May 17, 2019 | 11:43 a.m.

    Thanks so much for responding. We are in Baltimore so it will be a long commute to Chicago but I would love to check in out in the future if you are closer to the Maryland area. Good luck with the study and i look forward to seeing the final results. 

     
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    Carla Strickland
  • Icon for: Mahtob Aqazade

    Mahtob Aqazade

    Graduate Student
    May 15, 2019 | 09:32 a.m.

    Thank you for sharing your video and the resources that you shared. It is a very interesting study and as I am learning about computational thinking and learning trajectories, I am curious to see how it will expand to other math concepts and with students at other grade levels. In our project, one of the aspects that we would like to see how children develop debugging and commenting practices in a coding programming environment into mathematical concepts. 

     
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    Carla Strickland
  • Icon for: Todd Lash

    Todd Lash

    Graduate Research Assistant
    May 15, 2019 | 11:59 a.m.

    Hi Mahtob,

    It would be great to expand our work beyond fractions and grades 3/4 and hopefully, someday that will happen. We chose fractions as so many students struggle with them.  It seemed like an area of need, especially for students at grades 3 and 4 (CCSS) who were just beginning to run into some of the big ideas related to fractions, wherein misunderstandings can give way to misconceptions that impact student understanding for years to come. 

    Thanks for your interest!

     
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    Carla Strickland
    Rebecca Dovi
  • Icon for: Laura Bofferding

    Laura Bofferding

    Researcher
    May 15, 2019 | 02:20 p.m.

    This is an amazing project with such great resources.  I'm wondering if you could say more about the "learning by example" model.  Do you start out with these examples or are they scattered throughout?  Have you identified any features of good examples?

    Thanks!

  • Icon for: Andy Isaacs

    Andy Isaacs

    Higher Ed Administrator
    May 20, 2019 | 04:57 p.m.

    There's a lot of evidence that learning from worked examples can be very helpful -- something we all experience in our everyday lives when we learn "mimetically" by watching other people do things. Sort of the apprenticeship model.

    On the other hand, there's also evidence that if every problem kids have to solve is immediately preceded by a worked example of a quite similar problem, then the kids are not all that likely to be able to solve problems in general very well. After all, one definition of a problem is something you don't know how to solve, so if kids only get problems they do know how to solve (since there's always a worked example), then they're not doing problem solving.

    We think a lot about how to balance these approaches. When is it most helpful to give the kids a worked example, such as a working Scratch program, and when is it better to let them figure more out on their own? "Traditional" teaching approaches tend to over-emphasize telling kids stuff, but often when people try to correct shortcomings in traditional teaching they over-correct and are too undirected. Striking the right balance between learning by example and more open-ended approaches is tricky.

    So, the comment in our video was a passing reference to a pretty big issue we wrestle with.

  • May 17, 2019 | 01:53 p.m.

    Hi all, 

    I agree with Laura- I would love to hear more about the learning by example model and how it is utilized throughout the trajectories in your project. 

    Overall, I love the integration of UDL, computational thinking, and fractions at work in your project. Thanks!

  • May 17, 2019 | 07:14 p.m.

    Hi Maya,

    First of my hats off to working with elementary grades, this project is a start for addressing our CS education gap. I had a question regarding the mathematics learning trajectory. What does this LT look like and how is it connected to computational thinking? 

  • Icon for: Rebecca Borowski

    Rebecca Borowski

    Graduate Student
    May 17, 2019 | 11:26 p.m.

    Hi all! I really enjoyed your video and am excited about learning more about your work. 

    I noticed that in the Frog and the Fly activity, the frog slides along the line, rather than hopping in an arc above it from tick mark to tick mark. I research students' conceptions of number lines, and I find this difference significant - I was wondering if this was a deliberate choice (I'm assuming it was) and whether you could speak to your thoughts behind it. 

    Thanks again for sharing your work! 

     
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    Jessica Hunt
    Carla Strickland
  • Icon for: Carla Strickland

    Carla Strickland

    Co-Presenter
    May 18, 2019 | 01:41 a.m.

    Hi Rebecca! I love your question! Thank you.

    There are a few reasons we chose this movement, some more significant than others. On the CS side - this sliding motion is characteristic of the "move" block in Scratch. Students are very familiar with this block at this stage in the curriculum, so it was desirable to use it in this simple script they would be closely inspecting in order to debug the program. A hop motion (like a frog) would require more complex programming, but may have been worth it if we thought it was pedagogically appropriate for the math content.

    Now on the Math side, which I think is the focus of your inquiry, we did debate whether the movement should be a hop or a slide. In earlier grades, students do hop along number lines for addition and subtraction. In these lessons, however, we are focusing on the NF domain of the CCSS. More specifically, this lesson references 3.NF.2, which requires kids to understand a fraction as a number on the number line. After talking with a couple other Everyday Mathematics authors, we decided the slide motion was more appropriate than the hop motion for this focus. In the next Action Fractions lesson we have the following text for teachers: "To reinforce the notion of a number line as a model for thinking about fractions, remind children that fractions on a number line are numbers representing distances from 0 to an endpoint." We use an EM problem in the Warm-Up, and ask teachers to "Move your finger along the number line to explain this solution to the class. For example, I started at 0. I moved 3-sixths and then 1-fourth to get to 6-eighths."

    So in short, the sliding motion is more supportive of understanding a fraction as the distance from 0 to an endpoint in the number-line model. Personally, I also fancy the notion of kids potentially thinking about all the different numbers they may be passing on their way to the fractional endpoint. The frog is not hopping over these numbers, he is passing through them as he slides.

    Please feel free to check out the full lessons on our website. Would love to discuss more if you'd like.

    -- Carla

     
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    Katie Rich
  • Further posting is closed as the showcase has ended.