1. Shelly Rodriguez
  2. Associate Clinical Professor
  3. The UTeach Maker Showcase: An open portfolio for documenting, sharing, and assessing
  4. https://maker.uteach.utexas.edu/
  5. University of Texas at Austin
  1. Jason Harron
  2. http://www.jasonharron.com
  3. Graduate Research Assistant / Ph.D. Candidate
  4. The UTeach Maker Showcase: An open portfolio for documenting, sharing, and assessing
  5. https://maker.uteach.utexas.edu/
  6. University of Texas at Austin
Public Discussion
  • Icon for: Shelly Rodriguez

    Shelly Rodriguez

    Lead Presenter
    May 12, 2019 | 09:32 p.m.

    Thank you for taking the time to watch our video. We are very interested in your feedback, especially with regard to the following questions:

    1. What are your current thoughts about making as an educational tool?

    2. Do you feel that making should be included in teacher preparation? Why or why not?

    3. What do you see as the benefits and challenges of using an open portfolio to document and assess work?

     
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    Steven Greenstein
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    Brent Richardson

    Informal Educator
    May 13, 2019 | 10:13 a.m.

    UTeach Maker would be a great addition to any pre-service teacher education program. Even with all the discussion about student learning beyond the test, I've seen few programs that prepare teachers beyond the test. I am excited to see what this program is exploring through making and look forward to seeing how these educator transform formal education!

     
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    Shelly Rodriguez
    Jason Harron
  • Icon for: Jason Harron

    Jason Harron

    Co-Presenter
    May 13, 2019 | 04:40 p.m.

    Thank you, Brent. It has been an exciting journey to see these future educators grow and reimagine how learning can take place in their STEM classrooms. 

     
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    Steven Greenstein
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    Michael Ralph

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 13, 2019 | 10:25 a.m.

    This sounds like an exciting program. I'd love to see something like this in Kansas.

     
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    Shelly Rodriguez
    Jason Harron
  • Icon for: Jason Harron

    Jason Harron

    Co-Presenter
    May 13, 2019 | 11:10 a.m.

    Michael, thank you for your interest. We are currently in the process of replicating the UTeach Maker program as part of the Make For All initiative. We currently have 22 UTeach programs throughout the United States interested in expanding the UTeach Maker program, including UKanTeach at the University of Kansas. More information is available here: https://maker.uteach.utexas.edu/make-for-all

  • Icon for: Stephen Alkins

    Stephen Alkins

    Facilitator
    May 13, 2019 | 11:06 a.m.

    Great video!

         Certainly making is a valuable educational tool that should be present in every teacher's training regimen.  It actively engages students in science, which is often the largest barrier, especially for underrepresented minorities.  It promotes creativity and artistic abilities as essential to the scientific process and STEM.

         Regarding the challenges of the open portfolio, how has the documentation process been? One of the great benefits to Maker education and the open portfolio process is that you can see the challenges in real time and you can journal it (much like a lab notebook), but the process of doing this can disrupt the flow of the work as you spend more time trying to capture every detail rather than engaging in the work, itself.  I am curious if you had any issues here?

         Further, what challenges did you encounter in terms of recruiting underrepresented students to this program?

     
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    Shelly Rodriguez
  • Icon for: Shelly Rodriguez

    Shelly Rodriguez

    Lead Presenter
    May 13, 2019 | 07:01 p.m.

    Thanks for your questions Stephen. UTeach Maker has been a great journey. The documentation process has been fairly smooth since students select and curate what to include. We remind students during various events that they may want to include photos and reflection from the specific activity in their Showcase. We also host Showcase workshops once a semester to provide students an time to come together, reflect, and work on their showcase during the busy semester.

    As a woman of color, having a diverse group of students in UTeach Maker is a priority for me. My own experience at Maker Faires and in school makerspaces was one of the things that led me to establish this program. I personally work to recruit students who do not see themselves as makers and encourage them to take the risk to learn something new. The relationships I build with students as an instructor in the UTeach program have proved particularly useful in helping with recruitment. Additionally, reflection on equity, diversity, and access is a strand that runs through the UTeach Maker Showcase.

     
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    Steven Greenstein
  • Icon for: Alice Anderson

    Alice Anderson

    Researcher
    May 13, 2019 | 11:24 a.m.

    I love all the different tools and materials they're using. What a variety of projects they're creating. I am wondering what has been effective in communicating with schools about the skills the UTeach Fellows are developing. What do schools see as valuable about the program? What do they want to see changing in the teaching profession?

     
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    Shelly Rodriguez
    Jason Harron
  • Icon for: Jason Harron

    Jason Harron

    Co-Presenter
    May 13, 2019 | 04:24 p.m.

    Alice, great questions. Communication with schools takes place through a variety of channels. First, several of our UTeach Maker Mentors are teachers who work as teachers in makerspaces in schools in the Austin area. This provides our students with the opportunity to have real-world classroom experiences and see how making is already being successfully implemented outside of our program. Second, our students are required to do at least one maker-centered lesson as part of their Maker Showcase. This provides an opportunity for cooperating teachers in either mathematics or science to see what a maker lesson looks like in the classroom. We make these lesson plan publically available through our Maker Lesson Bank. Third, we do not have a makerspace in UTeach Maker. Originally, this was due to limited space, but we quickly discovered that having the students locating resources in the community and working with makers from outside of the university has been incredibly fruitful.

    Principals have seen value in students who have received our micro-credential and several of our graduates have been hired as engineering teachers, teachers for Project Lead the Way, as well as one graduate who was hired by an international school in Singapore who helped them establish a makerspace. 

    Like any new initiative, we have many challenges that we are facing within the teaching profession. Participants in our project have expressed the value in making, especially when it comes to learning through failure and building student confidence. However, we continue to face the limitations forced upon the classroom by standardized testing as well as limited exposure to what making actually looks like in a thriving STEM classroom. But, as our program continues to grow we look forward to seeing the inventive solutions that our graduates share with us!

    For more information and the voice of our participants, I also recommend viewing our 2018 STEM for All video

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    Jakki Spicer

    May 13, 2019 | 01:05 p.m.

    I love the work y'all are doing! So great to see it featured here.

     
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    Shelly Rodriguez
    Jason Harron
  • Icon for: Jason Harron

    Jason Harron

    Co-Presenter
    May 13, 2019 | 04:27 p.m.

    Thank you, Jakki! We appreciate the hard work that you put in for Maker Ed and your contributions to our recent white paper and Infosys C3 Maker Summit report

  • Icon for: Deanna Buckley

    Deanna Buckley

    Researcher
    May 13, 2019 | 02:12 p.m.

    I have seen directly the investment students bring to their projects which enables learning engagement at a much deeper level.  With interest in developing an idea to a physical object, students embrace learning new skills such as coding, sewing, woodworking, 3-D printing, cooking or any number of transferrable skills and/or use of tools.  I like the portfolio aspect and seeing this evaluation of their own success is powerful.  The variety of materials and creativity for producing is apparent.  Every school needs a maker space with credentialed teachers.

     
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    Steven Greenstein
    Shelly Rodriguez
    Jason Harron
  • Icon for: Jason Harron

    Jason Harron

    Co-Presenter
    May 13, 2019 | 04:34 p.m.

    Thank you, Deanna. The use of open portfolios has provided our participants with an opportunity to develop agency and ownership over their own learning, while also helping them reflect on their identity as both a Maker and STEM educator. Many of our participants have continued with the UTeach Maker program as UTeach Maker Fellows after graduation, along with continuing to update their Maker Showcase as a professional portfolio as an educator. We look forward to seeing the impact that these participants make in their schools as they enter service in the profession!

  • May 13, 2019 | 07:02 p.m.

    Thank you for sharing! I am very interested in how you were able to incorporate extra credits for the micro-credentials into your teacher preparation program. Are these students graduate or undergraduate? Did they take extra courses to complete micro-credential or did you change your program to fit in these courses? One of our major challenges - upper limit on number of credits our students can have in order to get degree, major requirements, and accreditation requirements that leave no room for any extra courses.

     
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    Shelly Rodriguez
  • Icon for: Shelly Rodriguez

    Shelly Rodriguez

    Lead Presenter
    May 14, 2019 | 10:36 a.m.

    Good to hear from you Irina. The students in UTeach Maker are primarily undergraduate STEM majors. The micro-credentialing program runs outside of the teacher preparation course work though some of the UTeach courses have started to include maker activities. The program is loosely modeled on my National Board experience. Each student creates an independent portfolio of their work while supported through monthly cohort meetings and weekend workshops where we do maker PD as well as internships in local makerspaces. There is no course credit for the program. 

  • Icon for: Alexandra Eusebi

    Alexandra Eusebi

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 13, 2019 | 08:13 p.m.

    This program is fabulous!  It's great to provide these opportunities to pre-service teachers.  I've seen first hand how incorporating maker projects in my own class rooms has increased the level of engagement, allowed students to grow by using new materials and tools, and provided them with ways to connect their own creative outlets to content.  I'm amazed at the number of times I have had students tell me they "weren't good at math" completely change their attitude and embrace new concepts when they were able to explore the material through an artistic or project based lens.  Maker projects are also beneficial in teaching underlying problem solving techniques and encourage students to "think outside the box".  UTeach's micro-credential program helps give these teachers of tomorrow a wonderful opportunity to move beyond the passive learning/teaching methods of the past and into a new mind set.

     
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    Shelly Rodriguez
  • Icon for: Chris Costello

    Chris Costello

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 13, 2019 | 10:05 p.m.

    Having worked in and around STEM teacher prep for the last decade, a clear theme has always been the need for developing and sustaining communities of practice and mentorship - at every level of the teaching profession. This helps more students enter the pipeline, allows them to see teaching as a realistic possibility, and continues to engage them as STEM professionals once they enter the classroom.

    A program like UTeach Maker, which incorporates dedicated mentors, access to innovative tools and labs, and shared curriculum/resources through open showcases, allows room for pre-service teachers to explore, grow, express, and reflect in super supportive environments. In return, Maker Mentors get to share their passions and engage with the next generation of teachers. In turn, this ultimately creates a community of teachers with the confidence to seamlessly integrate innovative and inclusive teaching practices into their daily routine.  

     
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    Steven Greenstein
    Shelly Rodriguez
  • Icon for: Patricia Marsteller

    Patricia Marsteller

    Facilitator
    May 14, 2019 | 12:07 p.m.

    What a wonderful project!  Love to have you find a way to teach grad students in STEM and faculty how to think about incorporating this  kind of program for higher ed STEM faculty.  With the development of innovation centers, it seems like this might be a great step.  Think about sharing your work with HEMI?

    http://hemi.mit.edu/

    How do you find ways to compensate students for their work? Can this be extended to practing teachers?

    How did you persuade faculty and others to be mentors for such projects?

     

     
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    Shelly Rodriguez
  • Icon for: Shelly Rodriguez

    Shelly Rodriguez

    Lead Presenter
    May 14, 2019 | 02:14 p.m.

    Hello Patricia,

    We are currently not affiliated with HEMI but we would love to know more if you have a contact.

    Currently students are not compensated for their work other than food at cohort meetings,  a sense of community, and a small stipend for their maker projects/lessons. We have recently added a few practicing teachers to the program. They have been very successful with this model so this can absolutely be extended to inservice teachers.

    We have found that starting with the students in our program has been a way to interest faculty. Our students are the best ambassadors for the positive impacts of making. 

  • Icon for: Paige Evans

    Paige Evans

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 14, 2019 | 12:08 p.m.

    Shelly,

    This is a great project and I look forward to collaborating with you in the future!

     
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    Shelly Rodriguez
  • Icon for: Shelly Rodriguez

    Shelly Rodriguez

    Lead Presenter
    May 14, 2019 | 02:09 p.m.

    Thanks Paige. Spreading the work to the 22 interested UTeach programs around the country is an exciting prospect.

  • Small default profile

    Rhonda Gum

    Parent
    May 14, 2019 | 02:42 p.m.

    What an amazing program! My husband has loved being a mentor. Yes, I absolutely believe that this should be included in all teacher training. I have two kids, ages 13 and 15. They sit in Science classes and they learn so many important concepts, and then they take a test and proceed to forget most of what they have learned. And the cycle repeats. Hands-on making allows them to get passionate about creating something, learn new and useful skills such as working with tools and computers, and actually internalize so many important STEM concepts. Keep up the good work!

     
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    Shelly Rodriguez
  • Icon for: Shelly Rodriguez

    Shelly Rodriguez

    Lead Presenter
    May 14, 2019 | 06:48 p.m.

    Thank you Rhonda. Having makers in the community serve as mentors is one of the hallmarks of the program. The real world experiences they bring are so valuable for our students!

  • Icon for: Joanne Figueiredo

    Joanne Figueiredo

    K-12 Teacher
    May 14, 2019 | 08:09 p.m.

    FABULOUS! I want to be a UTeach Maker! Honestly, I think all teachers need to incorporate making into their repertoire! Thanks for sharing this excellent video!

     
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    Shelly Rodriguez
    Jason Harron
  • Icon for: Shelly Rodriguez

    Shelly Rodriguez

    Lead Presenter
    May 15, 2019 | 09:49 a.m.

    Thank you for your comments Joanne. In addition to being a great way to access STEM content, making can help to humanize our classrooms by creating a learning space where student stories and interests are prioritized and valued!

  • Icon for: Michael Marder

    Michael Marder

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 14, 2019 | 09:06 p.m.

    Making was my doorway into STEM, at around the age of 9. A mathematics educator gave me a box of electronics parts with no directions, curious what I would do with it. The answer was that I turned into a physicist.

    Making can do that

     
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    Shelly Rodriguez
  • Icon for: Shelly Rodriguez

    Shelly Rodriguez

    Lead Presenter
    May 15, 2019 | 09:55 a.m.

    What an amazing opportunity! Hopefully the maker movement can find its way into the educational experience of more students so that they have a chance at the kind of transformative experience that you had.

  • Icon for: Alex Rudolph

    Alex Rudolph

    Facilitator
    May 15, 2019 | 10:20 a.m.

    This is a fascinating program and very nice video. I have a couple of questions:

    1) How much time do the participants spend in the program? How do they balance that against their other coursework?

    2) Do you have any data on the outcomes for participants in the job market?

    3) Are there ways this program could be brought to other groups, for example high school students? 

  • Icon for: Shelly Rodriguez

    Shelly Rodriguez

    Lead Presenter
    May 15, 2019 | 11:22 a.m.

    Hi Alex, these are great questions. Below are my thoughts.

    1. It varies, all participants spend at least two academic semesters with us but the average is 3-4 semesters. The program does not have assignments outside of the Showcase and students complete that at their own pace so they can decide on a timeline that works for them. We check in regularly to see what support they may need.

    2. UTeach graduates are all STEM teachers so they get scooped up by employers quickly. What kinds of participant outcomes do you think would be interesting to the larger community?

    3. The great thing about our open portfolio model is that it is highly adaptable to other settings and content areas. Once a program decides on a framework and goals, it can use the open portfolio as formative and summative assessment in almost any context.

     
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    Alex Rudolph
  • Icon for: Michelle Quirke

    Michelle Quirke

    Project Manager
    May 15, 2019 | 04:00 p.m.

    Excellent video. Can you share more about micro credentialing and how your program quantifies the hours/effort for each project to meet the goal of credentialing? 

     
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    Shelly Rodriguez
  • Icon for: Shelly Rodriguez

    Shelly Rodriguez

    Lead Presenter
    May 15, 2019 | 07:01 p.m.

    Hi Michelle,

    We get this question a lot. The micro-credential is issued by our program so we set the guidelines. What makes a credential meaningful is the reputation of the names behind it and the transparency of the credentialing process and products. UTeach has been a leader in inquiry-based STEM teacher preparation for over 20 years thus we have established expertise in this area. The products (maker showcases) are reviewed by external experts in the field of making, primarily Maker Ed, to ensure the work is high quality and meets the standards of the field.

    There are no specific hour requirements, though we do require a minimum of two academic semesters in the program. The UTeach Maker micro-credential is standards-based and we use the open portfolio system as documentation. The great thing about the open portfolio is that what our makers know and are able to do is on public display. This is much more valuable than a stamp on a transcript or a piece of paper. This also gives our teachers an artifact to talk from and about when meeting with potential employers or explaining what they do to other educators. 

  • Icon for: Kyle Albernaz

    Kyle Albernaz

    K-12 Teacher
    May 15, 2019 | 06:39 p.m.

    As someone who has been involved with this program since very near its inception, I am excited to see UTeach Maker expand beyond just UT and I hope to see it grow even further! I am currently a chemistry teacher at a relatively traditional high school and it is incredible the difference you see when students have agency and personal choice in their learning rather than the traditional skill and drill. Students are not only eager to create an artifact they can show off to their peers and parents, but are also excited to introduce their own personal flair to what they do.

    I would not have been able to create innovative lesson plans and focus in on the important creative aspect of education had I not joined UTeach Maker. The program prepared me to push the boundaries of how I teach my content in order to appeal to a broad range of students. While making can harbor some difficulties, such as funding and time constraints, the lessons wherein I'm able to incorporate a making aspect always garner far more engagement from my students. This is why I hope to see this program branch out to even more universities and see making in even more K-12 schools, as I have seen first hand the difference it can make!

    If anyone happens to have any questions from the classroom teacher's side of things, feel free to ask!

     
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    Shelly Rodriguez
  • Icon for: Shelly Rodriguez

    Shelly Rodriguez

    Lead Presenter
    May 15, 2019 | 09:08 p.m.

    Thank you Kyle. It is teachers like you that can be the change agents for your students and school communities! We are so proud to have you as part of UTeach Maker. Check out more of Kyle's thoughts in this Elements of Making article featured in last year's The Science Teacher.

  • May 17, 2019 | 09:16 a.m.

    This looks great.   How do you approach your evaluation beyond the open portfolio?  

    I would guess that this open portfolio will provide rich qualitative information but may be limited if you have specific questions that you want to explore about your program or the students.  For example how does this experience impact their interest in teaching, or change their approach to teaching? 

  • Icon for: Shelly Rodriguez

    Shelly Rodriguez

    Lead Presenter
    May 17, 2019 | 09:37 a.m.

    Thank you for your thoughts Melissa. To answer these types of questions we are engaged in a qualitative analysis of Showcase submissions. Other data sources include audio recording of public showcase presentations, participant surveys, and interviews. We have much more data than we can mine at this point and are excited about our initial findings. We hope to present a slice of this work at ASTE 2020.

  • Icon for: John Pecore

    John Pecore

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 17, 2019 | 10:43 a.m.

    Love what you are doing with Maker Space.  I sent your video link to a doctoral student of mine researching maker spaces.

     
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    Shelly Rodriguez
    Jason Harron
  • Icon for: Sara Heredia

    Sara Heredia

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 18, 2019 | 07:34 a.m.

    Hi Shelly,

    Love this! We have a program at UNCG where pre-service teachers volunteer as Makers-in-Residence in our makerspace each semester. We have been iterating on a design for organizing their maker portfolio, I love the feedback cycle that you have incorporated from both maker experts and the community. I'd love to hear about your design process as well and some of what you've learned works (and what doesn't!) We should connect! 

     
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    Shelly Rodriguez
  • Icon for: Shelly Rodriguez

    Shelly Rodriguez

    Lead Presenter
    May 19, 2019 | 05:40 p.m.

    I would love to chat with you about this. Will you be at ASTE this year? If so, maybe we should organize a maker educators meet-up one evening. 

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    Steven Fletcher

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 18, 2019 | 01:21 p.m.

    Great video and program! The work that you are leading is visionary and groundbreaking. Did I hear that you recently joined the Make for All movement? Is the plan to scale the micro-credentialing effort to other UTeach replication sites? 

     
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    Shelly Rodriguez
  • Icon for: Jason Harron

    Jason Harron

    Co-Presenter
    May 18, 2019 | 04:54 p.m.

    Hey Steven, thank you for the message.

    Yes, UTeach Maker as committed to the Make For All initiative. At least 22 UTeach programs throughout the United States recently responded to a survey expressing interest in adding making as part of their UTeach courses and/or possibly replicating the UTeach Maker micro-credential. More information about the UTeach Make For All initiative can be found here: https://maker.uteach.utexas.edu/make-for-all

  • Icon for: Heidi Carlone

    Heidi Carlone

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 20, 2019 | 11:34 a.m.

     Nice work, Dr. Rodriguez and team! Super innovative and important work. 

     
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    Shelly Rodriguez
  • Icon for: Shelly Rodriguez

    Shelly Rodriguez

    Lead Presenter
    May 20, 2019 | 11:54 a.m.

    Thank you Dr. Carlone. That means a lot.  It has been a lot of fun and I hope the lesson learned will benefit the broader STEM community. 

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    Maisha Rumman

    K-12 Teacher
    May 20, 2019 | 12:23 p.m.

    As a participant of this program, I've learned so much and made huge changes in my classroom. Making gets students excited to learn and incorporates the skills they need to master. Today in class we're making design journals and 3D printing a personally meaningful molecule. Thanks to UTeach Maker, I've been able to learn about my students more by watching them make.

  • Further posting is closed as the showcase has ended.