1. Christopher Hoadley
  2. http://steinhardt.nyu.edu/faculty/Christopher_Hoadley
  3. faculty
  4. Participating in Literacies and Computer Science
  5. http://www.pila-cs.org
  6. New York University
  1. Laura Ascenzi-Moreno
  2. https://www.lascenzimoreno.com/
  3. Assistsant Professor & Bilingual Program Coordinator
  4. Participating in Literacies and Computer Science
  5. http://www.pila-cs.org
  6. Brooklyn College, The Graduate Center, CUNY
  1. Sarah Radke
  2. Research Assistant
  3. Participating in Literacies and Computer Science
  4. http://www.pila-cs.org
  5. New York University
  1. Sara Vogel
  2. http://cuny.is/saraevogel
  3. Research Assistant
  4. Participating in Literacies and Computer Science
  5. http://www.pila-cs.org
  6. The Graduate Center, CUNY
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Public Discussion
  • Icon for: Christopher Hoadley

    Christopher Hoadley

    Lead Presenter
    May 12, 2019 | 09:15 p.m.

    Welcome to the presentation of our project! We're excited to share our approach to supporting students across languages to learn how to code in the context of various school subjects. We're relatively early in the process, working mostly with teachers who closely co-developed lessons with us, and are starting to explore ways to share our approach with teachers we don't directly codesign units with. Ultimately, our research is on how the technique of using translanguaging pedagogy and literate programming can support student literacies, including computational literacies.

    We welcome your questions and feedback, especially about how this approach might work in contexts you're more familiar with.

  • Icon for: Sara Vogel

    Sara Vogel

    Co-Presenter
    May 12, 2019 | 10:18 p.m.

    ¡Bienvenidxs a la presentación de nuestro proyecto! Estamos muy entusiasmados de compartir cómo nosotros apoyamos a los estudiantes multilingües a aprender a usar la programación en el contexto de varias materias escolares. Estamos en las primeras etapas del proyecto, colaborando con un grupo de maestros a co-diseñar lecciones y unidades y comenzando a compartir nuestras estrategias y filosofía con nuevos grupos de maestros. Investigamos como la pedagogía de translenguar (translanguaging) y la filosofía de programación comprensible (literate programming) puede apoyar la participación de los alumnos en conversaciones en sus comunidades y las diferentes disciplinas. 

    Invitamos sus preguntas e ideas, especialmente sobre cómo estas ideas se podrían aplicar a sus contextos.

  • Icon for: Christopher Hoadley

    Christopher Hoadley

    Lead Presenter
    May 13, 2019 | 11:14 a.m.

     Para ver una transcriptión del video en español, haga clic aquí: http://is.gd/apomax

  • Icon for: Gerad OShea

    Gerad OShea

    Facilitator
    May 13, 2019 | 12:41 p.m.

    Thanks for sharing your work!

    Can you provide some additional examples (e.g. grades, subjects, school vs. after school) of where this approach has been successfully used and any student or teacher impact stories (not necessarily data since this is early in the process)?

     
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    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Sara Vogel
  • Icon for: Christopher Hoadley

    Christopher Hoadley

    Lead Presenter
    May 13, 2019 | 12:56 p.m.

    So far our project has focused on in-school projects in middle school classrooms, in a variety of subjects. We've had teachers run units in English/Language Arts, Social Studies, Science/Math, and English as a New Language. There are a couple of nice examples from language arts described in our paper at SIGCSE (Special Interest Group in Computer Science Education) this year: https://doi.org/10.1145/3287324.3287368 In one case, students adapted a simulation of an interview with a book author, and students were able to bring in cultural figures they related to as part of an imagined bilingual conversation between the interviewer and interviewee.

     
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    Sara Vogel
  • Icon for: Sara Vogel

    Sara Vogel

    Co-Presenter
    May 13, 2019 | 12:57 p.m.

    Hi Gerad! Thanks for your question!

    We are going to spend this summer polishing up materials like curriculum unit walk-throughs which will include stories about students and teachers, so we will hopefully have some teacher-friendly resources to share by August/September. Stay tuned!

    In terms of research findings that trace student language and experiences, a good place to start is a paper that we recently published in the proceedings of SIGCSE:

    Vogel, S., Hoadley, C., Ascenzi-Moreno, L., & Menken, K. (2019). The Role of Translanguaging in Computational Literacies: Documenting Middle School Bilinguals’ Practices in Computer Science Integrated Units. Proceedings of the 50th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education, 1164–1170. https://doi.org/10.1145/3287324.3287368  
  • May 13, 2019 | 01:03 p.m.

    This work is helping us see (and value) the role of language in learning computer science. Thank You. Can you say something about how your approach builds on the larger Translanguaging movement--how is it similar or different?

     
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    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Todd Lash
    Sara Vogel
  • Icon for: Laura Ascenzi-Moreno

    Laura Ascenzi-Moreno

    Co-Presenter
    May 13, 2019 | 01:20 p.m.

    This is a great question.  Sara Vogel and I were part of the CUNY NYSIEB team that started working with schools to help them understand translanguaging theory and forge translanguaging pedagogies.  We see translanguaging within CS as a natural extension of translanguaging work that has been taking root in some schools.  Therefore, we see translanguaging as the organic way in which bilinguals use language in the world.  One important aspect of translanguaging is that students are not switching between languages but rather using resources from a unified linguistic repertoire and thus creating novel ways of languaging.  Our work with CS emphasizes that while emergent bilinguals learn CS they are drawing upon both their entire linguistic repertoire as well as their semiotic repertoire, using a range of tools such gestures, drawings, etc, to make meaning.  In this way, we are expanding translanguaging, so that both students' linguistic and semiotic resources are considered when understanding their learning.  So, to answer your question, our approach emerges from the translanguaging movement and adds to it.

     
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    Sara Vogel
  • Icon for: Sara Vogel

    Sara Vogel

    Co-Presenter
    May 13, 2019 | 01:26 p.m.

    Thanks, Jill and Laura!

    Anyone who is interested in learning more about translanguaging theory and pedagogy can check out the CUNY-NYSIEB work at their website here: https://www.cuny-nysieb.org/

     
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    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Jill Denner
    Todd Lash
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    Zoila Morell

    Researcher
    May 13, 2019 | 01:54 p.m.
    The video is concise, well edited, and appealing - great job!   I wish that we could develop more resources that teachers could use in the English medium class when they themselves do not speak the students' languages - that's the most common configuration for EBs.  Maybe emphasizing how teachers use Scratch (teacher interviews?) in a subsequent video would be another useful resource.

     

  • Icon for: Laura Ascenzi-Moreno

    Laura Ascenzi-Moreno

    Co-Presenter
    May 13, 2019 | 02:38 p.m.

    Zoila:  Thanks for visiting the site and watching the video!  One of the classrooms that we work with is an ENL class in which students speak at least 3-4 different languages.  We didn't emphasize it in the video although some of the footage from the video was in that class.  I think that's a great suggestion that we bring that to the forefront, so that teachers who teach in those settings understand how translanguaging pedgoagy and literate programming can help support CS learning, English acquisition, and general language development as well.

  • Icon for: Feng Liu

    Feng Liu

    Facilitator
    May 13, 2019 | 05:46 p.m.

    Thanks for sharing this great work! A few of colleagues of mine published one report last year (https://ies.ed.gov/ncee/edlabs/projects/project.asp?projectID=4528) about how English Language Learner (ELL) students' first language skills can benefit their learning of English and other academic content. We specifically looked at students whose first language is Spanish. Considering the similarity of Spanish and English linguistically (which I am not expert at all), I am wondering whether this PILA-CS program would have different impacts on student learning depending on the similarity the student first language is with English such as Spanish VS. Chinese.

    I am part of CS for All Teachers (https://csforallteachers.org/) team, and would be interested to have more conversation about how to support computer science teachers.

  • Icon for: Sara Vogel

    Sara Vogel

    Co-Presenter
    May 15, 2019 | 11:15 a.m.

    Students in our partner classrooms have a host of language backgrounds and experiences. While most students use Spanish and English, there are also students who use Arabic, French, Wolof, Amharic, Tigrinya, and even among those who use Spanish, there are key differences in their language and literacy experiences, interests, and resources. Our translanguaging lens is useful because it allows us to think about students language repertoires in a holistic way -- to notice a fuller range of practices and design CS experiences not just with static notions of L1 in mind. While the strategies you use with a student who has particular practices with Spanish may differ from a student who uses Chinese or languages that Scratch doesn't support, the idea of noticing and building on their resources is still central.

    Would love to learn more about the work toy do with CS for All teachers and will be taking a look at your research!

  • Icon for: Christopher Hoadley

    Christopher Hoadley

    Lead Presenter
    May 16, 2019 | 11:14 a.m.

    Just to reiterate a subtle point too---the question of whether students' whose first languages differ have different challenges in participating fully in school is important and interesting (for instance if you're going from a pictographic to an alphabetic language, or among related languages or unrelated languages), but we also find real differences in language backgrounds within languages, and that's why our project doesn't rely on translated curriculum. For instance, among kids whose home language is primarily Spanish, we see things like regional or national dialects; kids both with and without interrupted formal education (i.e., some kids didn't get to go to all of primary school before landing up here), kids who were raised in two countries by going back and forth vs kids raised in two countries where they moved permanently to the US, and more. Every kid's background varies, and so the point of the approach is to focus on techniques that allow kids to use whatever they bring to the table, rather than trying to design curricula around one particular non-English language.

  • Icon for: Feng Liu

    Feng Liu

    Facilitator
    May 18, 2019 | 08:20 a.m.

    I like the approach you mentioned "focus on techniques that allow kids to use whatever they bring to the table, , rather than trying to design curricula around one particular non-English language." This philosophy of constructivisim can help students build knowledge based on their own experience and background. It's similar to the perspective about educational technology that is to focus on how to use technology to facilitate learning rather than technology itself. Thanks for sharing!

     
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    Sara Vogel
  • Icon for: Sara Vogel

    Sara Vogel

    Co-Presenter
    May 18, 2019 | 10:02 a.m.

    Exactly! We advance the idea that, as Laura said in the video, teachers are in the driver's seat of designing and preparing experiences that draw on students' backgrounds, and so our project focuses on developing an approach to teaching and learning CS with emergent bilinguals, rather than a static curriculum.

  • Icon for: Rebecca Zarch

    Rebecca Zarch

    Researcher
    May 14, 2019 | 11:20 a.m.

    This is a great video!  I love that you were able to capture so many voices in it. Thanks!

     
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    Sara Vogel
  • Icon for: Sara Vogel

    Sara Vogel

    Co-Presenter
    May 15, 2019 | 11:19 a.m.

    Thanks, Rebecca! It's great to be a part of the vibrant RPP for CS for all network with you.

  • Icon for: Nancy McGowan

    Nancy McGowan

    Facilitator
    May 15, 2019 | 08:27 a.m.

    I am a big fan of Scratch programming and love that you have uncovered yet one more way that we can see to specific needs of students through programming.  I found your web site on translanguaging theory very informative and have shared this with colleagues.   

     
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    Sara Vogel
  • Icon for: Sara Vogel

    Sara Vogel

    Co-Presenter
    May 15, 2019 | 11:17 a.m.

    Thank you! Glad it was useful for you. We hope to add to the resources on translanguaging in CS contexts, so stay tuned!

  • Icon for: Christopher Hoadley

    Christopher Hoadley

    Lead Presenter
    May 16, 2019 | 11:15 a.m.

    yes, we are hoping to roll out teacher resources on our project website http://www.pila-cs.org this summer!

  • Icon for: Todd Lash

    Todd Lash

    Graduate Research Assistant
    May 15, 2019 | 10:11 a.m.

    What a great video and explanation of how you are addressing a real and imminent problem of practice.  This is important work and I look forward to seeing how the work expands CSforALL not just in NYC but more widely as well.  Kudos!

     
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    Sara Vogel
  • Icon for: Sara Vogel

    Sara Vogel

    Co-Presenter
    May 15, 2019 | 11:18 a.m.

    Thanks, Todd! Your work with students with disabilities is also a key part of the CS for All puzzle, glad we get to learn from each other!

  • Small default profile

    Julie Raskin

    May 15, 2019 | 10:59 a.m.

    I love this! I’m fairly uninformed about these issues but found this video very informative and accessible. Thanks for doing this very important work!

     
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    Sara Vogel
  • Icon for: Sara Vogel

    Sara Vogel

    Co-Presenter
    May 15, 2019 | 11:18 a.m.

    Thanks, Julie! You are always a real supporter :)

  • Further posting is closed as the showcase has ended.