1. Allan Feldman
  2. http://www.coedu.usf.edu/allanfeldman
  3. Professor
  4. Robert Noyce USF Scholarship Program for Science Majors
  5. http://bit.ly/USF-Noyce
  6. University of South Florida
  1. Stephanie Arthur
  2. Robert Noyce USF Scholarship Program for Science Majors
  3. http://bit.ly/USF-Noyce
  4. University of South Florida
Public Discussion
  • Icon for: Donna Stokes

    Donna Stokes

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 13, 2019 | 11:38 a.m.

    Great video with some wonderful testimonies about your program.  Can you let me know some of the innovative method used in your program to better prepare pre-service teacher?

  • Icon for: Stephanie Arthur

    Stephanie Arthur

    Co-Presenter
    May 13, 2019 | 01:34 p.m.
    The University of South Florida Robert Noyce Scholars Program, funded by the National Science Foundation, has contributed financial support to  24 Master of Arts in Teaching STEM-based scholars. This program created a pathway for high-achieving students in the science and mathematics fields into the secondary classroom. USF Noyce Scholars completed their coursework, practicum, and full-time semester-long paid internships with an emphasis on collaborative action research and culturally responsive pedagogy and a focus on advocating for social equity in classrooms. This research intensive preparation provided the solid foundation for our scholars to bring their passion and knowledge for the STEM fields to their students in high needs districts in Florida. We would be interested in feedback for how to enhance our approach and success for recruitment of STEM field university students into the teaching profession. Thank you for watching our video.  
     
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    Danielle Watt
  • Icon for: Phillip Eaglin, PhD

    Phillip Eaglin, PhD

    Facilitator
    May 13, 2019 | 05:17 p.m.

    Thanks for supporting STEM teachers where they are most needed!  I appreciate that the teachers are learning how to make their classrooms more inquiry based, which is essential for students to understand how science works.  Question: Are the teachers making any specific efforts to help students design science projects that solve problems in the students' homes, schools, and communities or science problems that connect to students' experiences and cultures?

  • Icon for: Stephanie Arthur

    Stephanie Arthur

    Co-Presenter
    May 14, 2019 | 09:59 a.m.

    Thank you for viewing our video. Yes, all of our Master of Arts in Teaching students, including our Noyce scholars, take a course that is devoted entirely to socio-scientific issues. This course prepares current and future teachers to combine nature of science, inquiry, and a look at the local and global community in meaningful and intentional ways that they can prepare middle and high school students to view scientific inquiry as a way to address problems in the community that can be solved using STEM concepts. During our students' internship in their semester-long field placement, they work with a university mentor/supervisor as well as the Noyce program to implement their strategies for including a more socio-scientific approach to their science lessons.

     
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    Phillip Eaglin, PhD
    Danielle Watt
  • Icon for: Marcelo Worsley

    Marcelo Worsley

    Facilitator
    May 13, 2019 | 11:24 p.m.

    This is very important work for changing the future of teaching. I wanted to ask about elements of the program that are specifically designed for working with students from under-represented communities? Additionally, are there strategies that you provide teachers so that they can more easily develop strong and trusting relationships with these students?

     
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    Peter Tierney-Fife
  • Small default profile

    Frederick Bradley

    Researcher
    May 15, 2019 | 10:53 a.m.

    Hello Marcelo, 

    My name is Fred as part of my work with the our Noyce program I have developed a middle and secondary science practicum course that incorporates elements of collaborative action research, and a journal club to serve as an arena for these new teachers to engage in collaborative autobiographical self-reflection. These endeavors have been dubbed The Noyce Community of Practice (CoP)Essentially the CoP serves as an arena where these future educators can examine their preexisting beliefs and foundational ideologies, as well as consider those of their practicum and future students. It utilizes a "workshop" environment where the students collaborate to dissect, critique, and gain understanding of: how our beliefs dictate the outcomes of our meaning making processes; the importance of recognizing, valuing, and utilizing students "ways of being" in the classroom; how promoting self-affirmation, self-efficacy, and self-affirmation in the science classroom can augment science teaching and learning; and how the science classroom is often positioned as a space between two homogenous spaces (i.e., teachers life experiences, and the life experiences of an increasingly diverse student population), which can also cause classrooms to exist as locales prone to cultural discord. Aside form curricular aims, the is also intended to aid in the development of supportive professional networks for these new teachers where they can share ideas, concerns, and innovations relevant to teaching science in high-need middle and secondary science classrooms. 

  • Icon for: Kristi Martin

    Kristi Martin

    Graduate Student
    May 13, 2019 | 11:38 p.m.

    What types of support do participants in your program receive as they go from being students to student teachers to novice teachers? 

    We have found that we can convince most of our pre-service teachers that inquiry lessons are important, but once they are faced with the realities of the classroom and schools/cooperating teachers may not support them actually implementing inquiry lessons, so they fall back on more traditional lessons. How do you ensure that they are actually implementing inquiry lessons when they are in the classroom? What supports do you provide for this?

     
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    Peter Tierney-Fife
  • Icon for: Stephanie Arthur

    Stephanie Arthur

    Co-Presenter
    May 14, 2019 | 10:08 a.m.

    Thank you for viewing our video. Great question and this is something that we have problemetized and taken a variety of approaches to support our Noyce Master of Arts in Teaching preservice teacher interns. Inquiry in nature of science takes time, space, and creativity. We have been lucky in that many of our collaborating teachers support this method for teaching STEM. However, to your point, there are those classroom situations where falling back on the more traditional modes of disseminating science lessons is a looming pressure on our interns. Our university mentor/supervisors work within the triad (intern, collaborating teacher, university supervisor) to help support lessons that focus on inquiry and through reflection, the members identify areas where inquiry-based lessons would be a better option when considering the outcomes, but this too takes time, which is an obstacle. One approach is through co-teaching which is something that must be organized and discussed in advance.

  • Icon for: Karin Lohwasser

    Karin Lohwasser

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 15, 2019 | 12:14 a.m.

    Hello Stephanie, 

    This is a very motivational video. I am wondering how you are supporting your collaborating teachers. As your university supervisors already are working with CT-TC dyads, you may be interested in some of the materials we have been developing for this work. Our video is giving a very brief intro....

  • Icon for: Paige Evans

    Paige Evans

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 14, 2019 | 12:05 p.m.

    The stories are powerful.  Thank you for sharing this!

     
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    Stephanie Arthur
  • Icon for: Danielle Watt

    Danielle Watt

    Facilitator
    May 14, 2019 | 02:10 p.m.

    Thank you for sharing your project! What are some of the outcomes for teachers who have completed the program, especially as it relates to 1.) preparation for teaching students in underrepresented communities and 2.) the teacher's beliefs regarding the roles their identities and experiences play in STEM teaching?

     
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    Peter Tierney-Fife
  • Icon for: Peter Tierney-Fife

    Peter Tierney-Fife

    Curriculum/Instructional Design Associate
    May 14, 2019 | 06:06 p.m.

    I am also interested in your response(s) to the questions above written by Marcelo and Danielle.

    I am excited to see your emphasis on inquiry approaches within a reflective community of practice model. I would love to hear more details or your thoughts about how the inquiry part is related to teaching students in communities underrepresented in STEM and/or relationship-building between students and teachers.

    Also, if are able to share or point to any frameworks/guidelines or examples related to inquiry approaches that explicitly [or more explicitly than others] address broadening participation in science and math—maybe things you use or have found helpful—it would be appreciated. Thanks!

  • May 15, 2019 | 12:56 p.m.

    Great project. Have you been able to come up with a cache of characteristics or approaches needed by the instructors to succeed in inquiry-based scientific classrooms?

  • Icon for: Holly Wiegreffe

    Holly Wiegreffe

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 16, 2019 | 08:07 a.m.

    I'd be interested in knowing if the Noyce Scholars remain in teaching longer than their peers and if so, do they stay at diverse schools?  I understand that isn't necessarily the goal of the program, but it sure would be interesting if the support they receive addressed these challenges too.  Do you have any data on this?  Holly

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