1. Seokbin Kang
  2. http://www.livehighkang.com
  3. PhD Candidate
  4. A Tangible-Graphical Approach to Engage Young Children in Wearable Design
  5. University of Maryland
  1. Jon Froehlich
  2. Professor
  3. A Tangible-Graphical Approach to Engage Young Children in Wearable Design
  4. University of Washington
Facilitators’
Choice
Public Discussion
  • May 13, 2019 | 09:06 a.m.

    Very cool research project! Do you have, or plan to gather any outcome measures? Do kids enjoy this more than other methods of learning (I bet they would!)? And any idea whether learning outcomes are improved?

  • Icon for: Seokbin Kang

    Seokbin Kang

    Lead Presenter
    May 13, 2019 | 05:00 p.m.

    Hi Lorna,

    Thanks for your questions. In our study, we interviewed children to examine what they learned from using PrototypAR. Children demonstrated their own understandings about complex systems they designed and experimented with. Interestingly, their findings/learning were very different across groups as they explored and tested different aspects of a complex system. We were pleased to see PrototypAr provides a kind of learn-centered environment where children can address their unique interests and deepen understanding. However, our study is limited in that we did not measure children's (improved) understandings before and after the activity nor compare our results with other methods of learning. 

  • Icon for: Gerad OShea

    Gerad OShea

    Facilitator
    May 13, 2019 | 04:11 p.m.

    Thanks for sharing your work! 

    The preliminary findings you mention sound encouraging. Can you share some details about how PrototypAR was being used in the research? For example, it looks from the video that students are working in small groups with an adult in an after school setting.

    Thanks,

    Gerad

  • Icon for: Seokbin Kang

    Seokbin Kang

    Lead Presenter
    May 13, 2019 | 05:08 p.m.

    Hi Gerad,

    Thank you for your interest. We conducted two studies as part of afterschool STEM programs in two local facilities. During the study, two or three children worked together as equal partners to design and experiment with PrototypAR and an adult facilitator helped them use the system. 

     

     

     
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    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Gerad OShea
  • Icon for: Gerad OShea

    Gerad OShea

    Facilitator
    May 17, 2019 | 08:57 a.m.

    Thanks, Seokbin. How do you imagine PrototypeAR will be implemented after this research phase? Is this small group with adult mediation the intended implementation? Do you see this as an after or out of school enrichment activity or something that could be scaled up for classroom use?

    Thanks,

    Gerad

  • Icon for: Feng Liu

    Feng Liu

    Facilitator
    May 14, 2019 | 11:08 a.m.

    Thanks for sharing this interesting project! 

    This approach seems to integrate multiple learning theories such as project-based learning, learning by doing, etc. I can see students are engaged in the learning process while gaining knowledge on the science content. I would like to know more about the impact evaluation process. I know you interviewed students about what they learned from using PrototypAR. You also mentioned in the video that one of the outcomes you saw is student interest/engagement in the learning. How did you measure those outcomes (e.g., survey)? Did you also consider to look at student content knowledge as one of the outcomes in the future? 

  • Icon for: Seokbin Kang

    Seokbin Kang

    Lead Presenter
    May 15, 2019 | 08:44 p.m.

    Thank you for your interest, Feng.

     

    We did a post-activity survey that examines children engagement with the system, a likert scale question used, and follow up on why they liked or disliked the system and the activity in the interview. Because this project was exploratory and completed, we do not yet have a plan to assess student knowledge gain. 

  • Icon for: Joanne Figueiredo

    Joanne Figueiredo

    K-12 Teacher
    May 14, 2019 | 08:02 p.m.

    What a great way for children to learn how things work! Very nice video, thanks for sharing!

  • Icon for: Jon Froehlich

    Jon Froehlich

    Co-Presenter
    May 17, 2019 | 09:10 a.m.

    Thanks Joanne!

  • Icon for: Nancy McGowan

    Nancy McGowan

    Facilitator
    May 15, 2019 | 09:06 p.m.

    I love the creativity and the ability to pursue personal interests! Your program has wonderful potential and looks to be very accessible for all with unlimited possibilities. Thank you!

  • Icon for: Jon Froehlich

    Jon Froehlich

    Co-Presenter
    May 17, 2019 | 09:10 a.m.

    Thanks Nancy!

  • Icon for: Debra Bernstein

    Debra Bernstein

    Senior Researcher
    May 16, 2019 | 09:29 a.m.

    What a great project!  I love that you've chosen a camera as a complex system for kids to explore.  Was there any confusion among students about the SLR camera model?  It looks quite different than the types of cameras most young children are exposed to (mostly cameras on phones, I'd guess).  Do you think they understood the similarity between the systems, even though they look different?

  • Icon for: Jon Froehlich

    Jon Froehlich

    Co-Presenter
    May 17, 2019 | 09:10 a.m.

    Hi Debra,

    A very insightful comment because we actually found this very thing during our formative and pilot studies (before the deployment study). So, we actually brought a physical DSLR camera with us and demonstrated it as part of the introductory material to the session. I think this helped. But you're right that the representation is important. Ultimately, we chose the DSLR because the components are larger and more modular, so "easier" to design.

    Jon 

  • Icon for: Peter Dorofy

    Peter Dorofy

    Informal Educator
    May 20, 2019 | 09:29 a.m.

    Nice project. Thanks for sharing. I have been working on some AR projects in our lab. Would love to connect.

  • Further posting is closed as the showcase has ended.