1. Serigne Gningue
  2. Professor Mathematics Education/Co-PI
  3. STEMELL
  4. Lehman College, CUNY
  1. Gillian Bayne
  2. Associate Professor Science Education
  3. STEMELL
  4. Lehman College, CUNY
  1. Sunyata Smith
  2. Doctoral Lecturer
  3. STEMELL
  4. Lehman College, CUNY
Public Discussion
  • Icon for: Kristen Reed

    Kristen Reed

    Facilitator
    May 13, 2019 | 08:50 p.m.

    This looks like a fabulous teacher training program! I was wondering what you are using to measure success? Are there particular teacher or student outcomes you are looking at? How would you recommend scaling this model to other programs in mathematics and science? Thanks! Kristen

  • Icon for: Gillian Bayne

    Gillian Bayne

    Co-Presenter
    May 14, 2019 | 12:06 p.m.

    We measure success of the STEMELL Program in many ways, including careful and consistent on-site observations by faculty and school administrators.  Additionally, students self-review and review their peers' pedagogical practices as lessons unfold in real time, and through videotaped vignettes. These practices are also evaluated through components of the Danielson Framework. Scholars participate in focus group meetings regularly, and responded to survey questions that are geared toward assessing lesson preparations and their enactments, interactions with students, and those had with mentor teachers.  Evidence of success has emerged from journal entries and Scholars' narrative responses to a variety of questions. 

    Scholars have had success not only in securing positions in schools that have a large number of ELL students, but also in schools where they have trained. These schools have had excellent success at retaining Scholars because of their growing levels of expertise. We also observe and mentor Scholars during their first year of teaching using the Lehman College Observation Protocol, modified to include a measure of teaching effectiveness using the Sheltered Instructional Observation Protocol (SIOP). From this tool, we have noted that mentor and observers have described Scholars' teaching as similar to those of third and fourth year teachers.

    The New York City mayor, Bill deBlasio, and New York City Department of Education Chancellor, Richard Carranza, visited our host school for Noyce Scholars, and commended the school for their outstanding graduation rate and the success of the school's advanced placement courses (see link below).

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=13FODLYu8OI

    Our success of the STEMELL program's creation, structure and its enactment has had ripple effects that have spanned into other aspects of the Department of Middle and High School at Lehman College in the Bronx, New York. Surveys of Noyce Scholars and comparison groups show that scholars provided higher ratings in their levels of confidence in addressing the needs of ELLs and gave higher ratings about the effectiveness of the teacher preparation program than their counterparts. The department consequently adopted the Noyce model that resulted in making changes for all of its undergraduate candidates so that they too can have similar clinically rich experiences.


    Hope this is helpful, Kristen.

         All the best,

         Gillian

  • Icon for: Rachel Garrett

    Rachel Garrett

    Facilitator
    May 14, 2019 | 06:35 p.m.

    Kudos for preparing teachers that understand EL students need to learn language and content at the same time - not at all easy, but so important.

    I'd love to hear more about the part of this work involving collaboration with mentoring teachers as candidates are in their field placement, and similarly how teachers were mentored their first year as teachers of record. Do you have a process for identifying and preparing those mentor teachers? It seems like that would be an important part of trying to replicate and scale your success.

  • Icon for: Serigne Gningue

    Serigne Gningue

    Lead Presenter
    May 15, 2019 | 05:59 p.m.

    Scholars were placed in the all EL school in Year I, and in mainstream classrooms in a regular school in Year II. We worked closely with the School administrators in both schools to identify and select the teachers who applied to be mentors. The application, which outlined the requirements and guidelines for the program, was followed by a personal interview. The Assistant Principals accepted to be in charge of organizing the placements and agreed to teach a weekly seminar course on site, after school on Fridays, to enable Noyce Scholars to debrief, discuss what they observed, analyze videos, and reflect on their experiences.

    The mentor teachers spent time with Noyce Scholars during the day they visited, co-designing and implementing lesson plans, and debriefing regular with them. The Saturday morning program in semester II was entirely taught by the Noyce Scholars under the supervision of the mentors, who again, would give them feedback at the end of the session.

    These two schools were both part of the Lehman College Professional Development Network. Teachers were used to working with our student teachers and fieldwork students.

  • Icon for: Cynthia Callard

    Cynthia Callard

    Facilitator
    May 14, 2019 | 10:30 p.m.

    Thank you for this video sharing the work on your Noyce project!  Developing highly qualified STEM teachers to support ELL students is critical.  You indicated that you have had 16 scholars graduate and are teaching in high-needs schools.  I was wondering if your project includes a way to support these scholars as they enter the field?  Are there opportunities for on-going support and networking to support retention?  Thanks!

     
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    Serigne Gningue
  • Icon for: Serigne Gningue

    Serigne Gningue

    Lead Presenter
    May 15, 2019 | 05:59 p.m.

    The structure of the program, a 5-year BA/MA, enables Noyce scholars to start teaching during the fifth year, the Master’s year while finishing that degree. Some scholars finish Student Teaching while earning their Bachelor degree (Case I), while others graduate without having done Student Teaching (Case II) but are able to earn a NYS Transitional B Certificate, valid for three years, which enables them to teach while finishing what remains of the master’s degree.

    Case I Scholars receive full year mentoring during their first year of teaching. A mentor visits them five times during the academic year. Mentoring in the second year is less formal and consists of 3 visits.

    Case II Scholars, on the other hand, enroll in the Internship course (equivalent to student teaching for someone who is teaching full-time) and get full supervision and mentoring benefits through that course. We provide a mentor who visits them 3 times during their second semester of teaching after completion of the internship course, and another 3 times during their second year of teaching. Ongoing support beyond the second year exists but is not formal. We contact them regularly to ask about their progress in the field. It is also common to see a scholar take more time to finish their master’s degree, giving us the opportunity to continue to monitor their situation

  • Icon for: Cynthia Callard

    Cynthia Callard

    Facilitator
    May 17, 2019 | 09:14 a.m.

    Thank you for sharing.  I appreciate the mentoring support, as I often feel that we do not do a good enough job of this as students earn their certification and enter teaching!

     
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    Serigne Gningue
  • Icon for: Hillary Kolos

    Hillary Kolos

    Informal Educator
    May 15, 2019 | 11:33 a.m.

    Hello from fellow presenters from the Bronx! This project is very inspiring and so needed.

    I appreciate the moment where the teacher in the video asks the students to share words from their first languages. Are there other parts of your model that explicitly train the teachers to introduce the material in ways that are culturally-relevant? If so, what have you seen as an impact with that approach?

    If you are interested, our project is working with students from the Bronx to connect them to STEM identities and human-centered design using digital badges and portfolios: https://stemforall2019.videohall.com/presentati...

    Thank you for sharing your important work!

  • Icon for: Gillian Bayne

    Gillian Bayne

    Co-Presenter
    May 21, 2019 | 09:57 a.m.

    Thank you for your questions

    Our Scholars use several strategies that are aligned with students' cultures, including soliciting reflections from students regarding how best they learn, what strategies they enjoy, and what have they found within their own cultures and educational experiences that serve them well in their leaning.  Some of our science textbooks and videos have multilingual components that within them one can find, for example, cultural analogies,definitions, and visual equivalents.  Additionally, many of our Scholars themselves come from diverse backgrounds that provide for cultural alignment and resonance.  Some of what the students share and is found to be helpful for the collective gets incorporated into lessons. This sharing as affords insights into aspects of cultural similarities as well as differences that make for rich conversations, and hence deeper understandings.  Essentially, not only do Scholars scaffold lessons, integrate differentiated strategies using vocabulary that is aligned with students backgrounds, group students according to their English proficiencies, they are also quite creative in experimenting with novel ideas that they think will help students.  We are involved now in furthering our understanding of many of these strategies by continuing to evaluate our data through video analysis, journal entries, focus group meetings and more.

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