Icon for: Liz Cook

LIZ COOK

History Colorado
Public Discussion
  • Icon for: Cara Duncan

    Cara Duncan

    Graduate Student
    May 13, 2019 | 12:30 p.m.

    How great for youth to learn early that Traditional Ecological Knowledge is equally valuable in STEM and other disciplines! Do the students participate in conducting research or creating projects to highlight the contributions and/or parallel tenets of TEK?

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Shannon Voirol
  • Icon for: Liz Cook

    Liz Cook

    Lead Presenter
    May 14, 2019 | 04:42 p.m.

    Hi Nikki, good question. The collaborative fieldwork featured in the video was the first year of the project, and in the next year we are hoping to engage more Ute students at the three tribes in more in-depth projects. We're planning to create and connect with opportunities that might range from elder-youth workshops, to undergraduate internships, to science fair projects that highlight Ute TEK.

  • Icon for: Noah Feinstein

    Noah Feinstein

    Facilitator
    May 13, 2019 | 10:13 p.m.

    This sounds like a fantastic program, and I love that History Colorado is involved in it - what a great example of how a museum can bring people together! Could you tell me more about what the participants took away from their experience? In designing this program, what outcomes were important to you - and were you able to conduct any evaluation around those outcomes? It sounds like the program made a big impression, and I'd love to know more about the impact it had on the youth, as well as the Ute Elders and the Western Scientists.

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Shannon Voirol
  • Icon for: Liz Cook

    Liz Cook

    Lead Presenter
    May 14, 2019 | 04:56 p.m.

    Thanks for the comments, Noah. Our goals for the Ute youth participants over the course of the five year project (we are in year 3) are to have an increased interest in both Traditional Ecological Knowledge and STEM, to see themselves as STEM learners and practitioners, and in the long-term, increased STEM education and workforce participation. Our evaluation for this audience and these goals has been in-depth interviews, both on camera and via phone after the summer field trips. We're finding that the youth (and elders) are definitely interested in the connections between STEM and TEK, and are excited to see themselves as TEK practitioners. In the next phases of the project we may focus more on how students build STEM identities. 

    This video is actually one of nine videos we created for our exhibit on the project. The other videos are available to view on vimeo https://vimeo.com/showcase/5723628 The "Youth, Elders, and Scientists" and "Next Generations" videos have more footage of the youth talking about their experiences.

    Liz

     
    2
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Jonathan Lewis
    Noah Feinstein
  • Icon for: Rabiah Mayas

    Rabiah Mayas

    Facilitator
    May 14, 2019 | 01:01 a.m.

    Thank you for sharing this project and for the critical critical reminder of how science has been lived and practiced in Native and Indigenous populations long before modern history. I've only recently learned about TEK and am curious about how your program elevated the key relationships between living things and their environment. Did the Western-influenced sciences demonstrate any shift in their self-positioning or self-perception with respect to the natural world?

    As a practitioner, I also wonder what kind of preparation did you provide to the Ute Elders and scientists specifically in support of their collaborative work? Did you find a particular type of support, training or coaching was critical, either in advance or along the way? 

  • Icon for: Liz Cook

    Liz Cook

    Lead Presenter
    May 14, 2019 | 05:10 p.m.

    Those are both great questions! Let me answer the second one first:

    The Ute elders and the scientists from the Dominguez Archaeological Research Group had already been working together on a number of projects, so we were very fortunate to build on the relationships and best practices that they had developed over the past decade. One of the takeaways from our first year of field work was we ensured that the TEK experts always spoke first when were looking at different archaeological sites, ecological zones, historic locations. We found that it was effective for the science experts to engage as part of the TEK-centered conversation, but that it was much more challenging for the TEK experts to thread their perspectives into conversations that were initiated from a "science" perspective.

    The first question is really interesting. Dr. Kelly Kindscher, an ethnobotanist and one of our scientist partners would probably say that his work already ties into those key relationships with living things. I'll be curious to ask that question of some of the archaeologists on the project. I know that some of them have mentioned a shifting focus to "Cultural Landscapes", and I'm curious how that is playing out for them in more detail.

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Marilu Lopez Fretts
  • Icon for: Rabiah Mayas

    Rabiah Mayas

    Facilitator
    May 16, 2019 | 08:05 p.m.

    Thank you for the reply, Liz!  Love the piece about having the TEK experts speak first; it seems like a simple approach, but I imagine one that requires consistent intention and attention.  And as a biochemist (with no field work) I can't say that I ever felt a strong connection to living things and nature through my work, though many years later I lament the opportunities missed to create such ties. With our work now with middle graders, I'm more and more interested in supporting development of STEM identities through non-human-centered views of the natural world. Thank you for sharing this work!

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Liz Cook
  • May 14, 2019 | 01:16 p.m.

    Hi. It is great to hear about a project leveraging Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK). I am interested in knowing more about the teacher training aspect of this work. Were aspects of this program integrated into the school day curriculum?

    thanks!

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Shannon Voirol
  • Icon for: Liz Cook

    Liz Cook

    Lead Presenter
    May 14, 2019 | 05:26 p.m.

    Hi Catherine, 

    We're just about to start on the teacher training and K-12 outreach components of the project this summer and the upcoming school year. For educators our medium-range goal is increase ability and motivation to teach both Ute content and STEM skills. Because Colorado social studies standards have Colorado history primarily at 4th grade, we think we may have some opportunities to explore how elementary educators can combine STEM and social studies in innovative ways. Now I'm thinking we'll have to document this on film for next year's showcase.

  • Icon for: Anne Kern

    Anne Kern

    Facilitator
    May 15, 2019 | 04:20 a.m.

    Aikenhead (Aikenhead & Michell, 2011) suggests the validity and reliability of Indigenous ways of knowing (or living in nature) can be thought of as the survivability of Indigenous people since time immemorial. Is there a way to bring together the two epistemologies, rather than view them as two separate ways of knowing? Thoughs?

  • May 18, 2019 | 12:08 a.m.

    Relatedly, I wonder if any part of the program connects Indigenous ways of living in nature with ideas about conservation?

  • Icon for: Liz Cook

    Liz Cook

    Lead Presenter
    May 20, 2019 | 05:13 p.m.

    To answer both of these questions:

     Our hope is that this project is bringing together the two ways of knowing, and making more explicit the ways that they are deeply connected, and possibly form a whole. The evaluation interviews are highlighting the places that there are deep connections. The interviews are also highlighting what motivates an understanding of those connections. Is it a conversation ethos? Is it coming from a deep sense of identity, and desire to maintain a cultural identity, or transform a cultural identity? Great questions for us to explore further!

  • Icon for: Brian Drayton

    Brian Drayton

    Researcher
    May 15, 2019 | 07:49 a.m.

    I hope you've checked out this video presentation on the Indigenous Mapping Project, with its attendant conversation. 

    https://stemforall2019.videohall.com/presentati...

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Shannon Voirol
  • Icon for: Anne Kern

    Anne Kern

    Facilitator
    May 17, 2019 | 12:51 a.m.

    Yes, I have, and this is awesome! In fact, I have asked my project team to look at is.

    The researchers do talk about an "app" to facilitate making the maps. Can you tell me more about that or give me the name and contact of someone who could? I have a project starting up in June that has Tribal youth collecting stories about their local environment and talking to Tribal elders and leaders about the decision-making process they go through to let the youth make high-quality podcasts about it. I would love to see if we could try to use the App.

  • Icon for: Liz Cook

    Liz Cook

    Lead Presenter
    May 20, 2019 | 05:14 p.m.

    Brian: The Indigenous Mapping Project looks amazing, and it's no great to see a practical, high-tech, complex solution to some of the questions of cultural IP that we've been pondering. I'm exciting to explore that project more, and see if there are ways to work together.

  • Icon for: Shannon Voirol

    Shannon Voirol

    Informal Educator
    May 15, 2019 | 11:23 a.m.

    Hi all

    I'm Shannon one of the CO-Pi's with Liz on the project. To answer Nikki's good question about the students role in doing research and creating projects that highlight tenets of TEK/STEM that answer is yes.  The students have been increasingly involved in the filming and interviewing of their elders about TEK. And those films are now on display at History Colorado Center in our exhibit Written on The Land. When that exhibit opened last December many of the Ute students travelled five hours to Denver to share their participation with their tribal leadership and our museum visitors. And more importantly, those films that Utestudents, elders and scientists are helping to make will also be part of exhibits that are on display in their tribal communities. 

  • Icon for: Torran Anderson

    Torran Anderson

    Community Engagement Coordinator
    May 15, 2019 | 06:38 p.m.

    Fantastic project! Thank you for sharing your video.

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Liz Cook
  • Icon for: Liz Cook

    Liz Cook

    Lead Presenter
    May 20, 2019 | 05:15 p.m.

    Thanks, Toran!

  • Small default profile

    Steve Longsdorf

    K-12 Teacher
    May 15, 2019 | 08:02 p.m.

    It's so exciting to see Ute youth involved.  And so exciting to know that there are so many possibilities for knowledge and appreciation of ancient practices.  This work is so important.

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Liz Cook
  • May 17, 2019 | 01:31 p.m.

    Hi Liz

    Very inspiring work.  Thank you.  You mentioned undergraduate internship possibilities.  Are you aiming to leverage nearby funded projects that are working to ensure the success of underrepresented minority students (e.g., at Fort Lewis College)?  

  • Icon for: Liz Cook

    Liz Cook

    Lead Presenter
    May 20, 2019 | 05:24 p.m.

    Jonathan, thanks for watching the video. That's a great suggestion. We've been working mostly with the Education Departments at the Ute Tribes, and I know building that stronger network between informal science education, formal K-20, and the tribes is big goal for everyone involved. The Fort Lewis STEM project is a great potential partnership.

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Liz Cook
  • Icon for: Edna Tan

    Edna Tan

    Researcher
    May 17, 2019 | 02:15 p.m.

    How inspiring. What Rich articulated about the importance of the land, and being on with land, as opposed to other forms of representing such relationships, was powerful. How did the youth describe their experiences, related to being on the land? 

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Liz Cook
  • Icon for: Liz Cook

    Liz Cook

    Lead Presenter
    May 20, 2019 | 05:27 p.m.

    Great question, and great opportunity for me share one of my favorite videos that we created for the Ute STEM exhibit on display at History Colorado. This video was made in June 2018, during fieldwork in the San Luis Valley. https://vimeo.com/showcase/5723628/video/317367005

    At the 3:40 mark, Jazmin Caremonoros, one of the youth participants from the Southern Ute Indian Tribe, talks about her own response to being in these landscapes.

  • Icon for: Cynthia Crockett

    Cynthia Crockett

    Researcher
    May 20, 2019 | 11:22 a.m.

    I have to agree with Rabiah's and Cara's comments on what a wonderful project this is and how critical a reminder it is "of how science has been lived and practiced in Native and Indigenous populations long before modern history." There seems to be very rich potential for place-based learning for students (and PD for teachers). What a wonderful opportunity to "hit pause" on the fast-track of 'today' and review the level of appreciation and value that was associated with this type of living and learning. I wonder if any students and/or teachers have been able to use this experience as a jumping off point for integrating STEM/TEK into their classrooms and out-of-school activities.

    Thanks for this video and project!

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Liz Cook
  • Icon for: Liz Cook

    Liz Cook

    Lead Presenter
    May 20, 2019 | 05:30 p.m.

    Great question, in the next phase of the project we're hoping to see how we can make connections between the field experience and the classroom. The partners from the tribal education departments were interested in the opportunity to be seen as "STEM providers" for their local school districts, so we might have more for a video in 2020 or 2021.

  • Further posting is closed as the showcase has ended.