1. Jiyoung Lee
  2. Graduate Student Researcher
  3. STUDIO and Mobile City Science
  4. https://www.studionhwa.org/
  5. University of Washington, Neighborhood House
  1. Chris Batalon
  2. http://www.studionhwa.org
  3. STEM Coordinator
  4. STUDIO and Mobile City Science
  5. https://www.studionhwa.org/
  6. Neighborhood House, University of Washington
  1. Don LaBonte
  2. Graduate Researcher
  3. STUDIO and Mobile City Science
  4. https://www.studionhwa.org/
  5. University of Washington, Neighborhood House
  1. Erin Riesland
  2. STUDIO and Mobile City Science
  3. https://www.studionhwa.org/
  4. University of Washington, Neighborhood House
  1. Leslie Rupert Herrenkohl
  2. http://www.soe.umich.edu/people/profile/herrenkohl_rupert_leslie/
  3. Professor
  4. STUDIO and Mobile City Science
  5. https://www.studionhwa.org/
  6. University of Michigan
  1. Katie Taylor
  2. https://education.uw.edu/people/faculty/kht126
  3. Assistant Professor
  4. STUDIO and Mobile City Science
  5. https://www.studionhwa.org/
  6. University of Washington
Public Discussion
  • Icon for: Erin Riesland

    Erin Riesland

    Co-Presenter
    May 12, 2019 | 07:15 p.m.

    STUDIO is designed to run quarter-long STEM curricula developed by graduate students from the College of Education in cooperation with Neighborhood House staff and undergraduate mentors chosen from across the University of Washington.

    In the video, the youth are celebrating the results of their hard work by sharing their creations through Showcase. High schoolers designed and coded robots while middle schoolers followed a variation of Katie Headrick Taylor's Mobile City Science curriculum that infused immersive VR, and AR location-aware technologies as part of a participatory neighborhood mapping project. Youth created their own VR-enabled spaces using imagery taken from a variety of locations around their community and implemented using CoSpaces and Google Street View. A blockly-like programming language enabled youth to program imaginary scenes into the virtual landscape. Youth published their virtual images to Google Earth which they later encountered in VR walks. Throughout, youth traced paths through the city and inscribed them onto digital maps. A collaborative Google map was used to place their re-designed places, record their paths, and re-imagine the landscape of their community. 

     
    2
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Kelsey Edwards
    Jiyoung Lee
  • Icon for: William Spitzer

    William Spitzer

    Facilitator
    May 13, 2019 | 10:45 a.m.

    The voices of youth and mentors in this video were so compelling and heartfelt, and it was clear that this project means a great deal to those who are involved in it.

    It would be great to see and hear more about the kinds of projects that the youth and mentors were involved in, some of which you describe a bit in the post above. You also mention leadership development and social/emotional learning, and I was wondering how those are incorporated.

    I was also curious to hear more about how you are capturing the impacts of this program on both youth and mentors.

    Thanks,
    Billy

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Jiyoung Lee
  • May 13, 2019 | 11:27 a.m.

    I couldn't agree more! I just LOVE to see projects involving communities that would not have an opportunity like this otherwise!
    That being said, I too would like to know if there is more information on the projects under this umbrella. How do students get to participate in a specific project? In my head, I see some sort of Science Fair where projects are presented and students are "recruited" to participate! :)
    Such great work!

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Jiyoung Lee
  • Icon for: Chris Batalon

    Chris Batalon

    Co-Presenter
    May 13, 2019 | 08:43 p.m.

    Hi Kenia,

    Thank you for your comment! In terms of general recruitment, Neighborhood House has the staffing capable of doing door to door outreach for new members for STUDIO. We are generally well received since the programs origin started in 2014. Because of this long standing residency at the same location, families who live in the neighborhood often know exactly what STUDIO is all about and so recruiting for youth is generally created that way. We also use social media, word of mouth tactics, and flyer at various events. We are also in good standing with other youth serving organizations around the West Seattle area and so they often promote for us as well.

    In terms of letting youth pick which project they would like to participate in, what generally happens is that the quarter before, whoever is leading a project talks in front of all of the program participants, and let's the youth know of the exciting project they are creating for the up coming quarter. After that, the youth are free to choose which project they would like to be a part of. Some examples that mentors and Neighborhood House staff have led in the past are: Wood shop, coding, photography, videography, 3d printing, music engineering, and so forth. We also highly value community buy in, so we often ask our youth what they would like to learn, and then do our best to create curriculum centered on what the youth are passionate about. Hope that answers your question!

    Chris

     
    2
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Jiyoung Lee
    Kenia Wiedemann
  • Icon for: William Spitzer

    William Spitzer

    Facilitator
    May 16, 2019 | 10:34 a.m.

    Chris, this project sounds great, and I look forward to hearing more about what you find in terms of impacts.. and hope you will post any evaluation results to informalscience.org!

  • Icon for: Jiyoung Lee

    Jiyoung Lee

    Lead Presenter
    May 13, 2019 | 01:25 p.m.

    Thank you for the comments and interests in STUDIO! 

    On projects that youth and mentors are involved in- What Erin described above is an example of graduate student/staffs (at NH) designed and facilitated projects. There are different quarter-long projects that involve more undergraduate mentor input.  At the end of each quarter (with exception of fall), we take youth interest survey on what they want to explore and learn in STEAM, and staffs, graduate students, and undergraduate mentors design projets-based learning curricula based on the results of the survey. We usually run one project per quarter, but when we have run multiple projects per quarter, youth can pick their first, second, and third choices. We make sure that youth either get first or second choices in each quarter. For example, in Winter 2018, middle school youth expressed interest in learning about general school science, and 2 experienced undergraduate mentors (with over 5 quarters of participation) and myself designed Food science curriculum called World through Food. It aimed to connect the mentors' expertise (Biology majors) and youth's interest to explore further in what they learn in school while including hands-on activities(e.g. cooking), and sense-making activities (e.g. exploring how and why ground meat gets sticky as they handle mixture). During the fall quarters, we have more short activities (e.g. scribbling machine, paper circuits) to get mentors and youth more familiar with tinkering and routine/structure of STUDIO. 

    On social/emotional learning and leadership programs, Neighborhood House staff and UW graduate students have co-designed 6-weeks long curriculum on self-awareness and compassion. Activities involved reading poems together to reflect on how self-compassion looks like in youth's and mentor's lives, and creating plaster cast of their faces to express the dichotomy between what we feel inside and what we think others perceive us by painting outside and the inside of the cast. 

    Recruiting Mentors- We recruit only during fall and winter quarters because we require the mentors to participate at least two quarters. We believe that time is important for youth and mentors to build relationships. We recruit university-wide (via adviser emails, in person advertisement (e.g. STEM and education classes, and clubs), and through connections with existing mentors. Returning mentors recruit their friends and that way, we were able to recruit mentors who are open-minded, and interested in STEM mentoring. We also have an initial orientation (4hour long) and survey to inform the new mentors about our commitments, purpose, and expectation. 

     

    Thank you! 

    Jiyoung 

     

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Kenia Wiedemann
  • Icon for: Elysa Corin

    Elysa Corin

    Facilitator
    May 14, 2019 | 10:50 a.m.

    Thank you for sharing your project!  It was wonderful to hear from participants and stakeholders who play different roles in STUDIO.  I was wondering if you could speak more about the design and impact of the STUDIO program model -- what elements have you found to be the most important for creating this rich community space for youth development and STEM learning? And, what challenges have you encountered when working to build this community?  Thanks!

     
    2
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Jiyoung Lee
    Kenia Wiedemann
  • Icon for: Erin Riesland

    Erin Riesland

    Co-Presenter
    May 14, 2019 | 05:50 p.m.

    Hi Elysa! Neighborhood House's central location and open-door policy have been one of the program's most valuable assets. Dedicated mentors who devote their time, energy, and expertise are integral to the success of STUDIO. Over the course of the quarter, mentors build near-peer relationships with the youth which encourage youth to take risks in their learning and have fun in the process. My biggest challenge has been the ratio of girls to boys, which is partly a cultural artifact of the population STUDIO serves. We are looking into starting a STUDIO-led girl's STEM club as a way of acknowledging cultural challenges while also reaching out and providing support to the next generation of women scientists. 

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Jiyoung Lee
  • Icon for: Jiyoung Lee

    Jiyoung Lee

    Lead Presenter
    May 17, 2019 | 03:02 p.m.

    Thank you Elysa for interest in our program. Building relationships is one of the most difficult challenges for new mentors when they join STUDIO. Although our NH staffs have been working there as long as the STUDIO existed, we have a constant flow of new youth and mentors joining in. We do a lot of team building activities as well as non-STEM activities that are specifically designed to get to know each other as a person (e.g. video games, board games, informal conversations, field trips). There are also group activities (e.g. Friday reflective seminar on a university campus) exclusive for mentors to reflect on their mentoring practices, and to share challenges and success that they encounter in STUDIO. And, many many socials such as happy hours, and potlucks. 

  • Icon for: Margaret Glass

    Margaret Glass

    Facilitator
    May 14, 2019 | 12:19 p.m.

    Thanks for the posts describing your recruitment strategies for both youth and mentors. Given that Neighborhood House has such a long history in the community, are there any practices in place for longitudinal studies to follow the life or career trajectories of participants?

    Looking forward to hearing more!

    Margaret

     
    2
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Jiyoung Lee
    Kenia Wiedemann
  • Icon for: Jiyoung Lee

    Jiyoung Lee

    Lead Presenter
    May 17, 2019 | 02:52 p.m.

    Hi Margaret, 

    Thank you for your question. This is something that we are thinking about as the program continues to develop! Students who graduated from STUDIO still visit NH to talk to the staffs, and use the facilities. We have not formally tracked the students who have participated in STUDIO, but NH staffs talk to small group of youth on a regular basis, and keep in touch with them personally. 

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Margaret Glass
  • May 15, 2019 | 09:47 a.m.

    What an incredible video and program!

    I love that there is a nurturing of mentor-mentee relationships and that the students view their community critically and think about how they might like to see it changed. A colleague at WCS created software for New Yorkers to also re-imagine their city-scale called Visonmaker

    Can I access the VR worlds that the students created? I'd love to see what they look like.

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Jiyoung Lee
  • Icon for: Erin Riesland

    Erin Riesland

    Co-Presenter
    May 16, 2019 | 10:17 a.m.

     Hi Jason, Visionmaker looks amazing! I look forward to trying it out. So sorry for the delay to your question. It prompted me to think about the best way to share one part of what the students made – and it just occurred to me how to do it.

    Here is a link of one part of the youths' collaborative map which includes their placed virtual locations & QR code. Download the CoSpaces app on your phone to view (a cardboard viewer is recommended for VR). 

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Jiyoung Lee
  • Icon for: Kristana Textor

    Kristana Textor

    Graduate Student
    May 16, 2019 | 06:02 p.m.

    Wow, your video is polished and captivating. Really enjoyed hearing the young man's experience in his own words about his relationships with mentors. Can you tell us a bit more about the resources you leveraged to make the video? It's clearly a professional job, how big was the crew? Did the students shoot some video themselves? What was your timeline like for pre-production? Budget? What kind of resources would someone need to put together a video of this caliber? It's so well done, great work!

    -Kristana

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Jiyoung Lee
  • Icon for: Jiyoung Lee

    Jiyoung Lee

    Lead Presenter
    May 17, 2019 | 02:53 p.m.

    Hello Kristana, 

    This was produced by UW college of education videographer, Harley. He shot this by himself with two cameras (I think). We are so grateful for his dedication and skills! 

  • Icon for: Harley Pan

    Harley Pan

    Higher Ed Administrator
    May 20, 2019 | 05:00 p.m.

    ?? 

    Kristana

    I'm the videographer. This was a 1-man work. There were 5 interviews in total. And 2 classroom documenting sessions.

    Budget: I'm the in-house videographer working in UW College of Education, so I made this for them, including pre-production (planning), production, and post-production (editing). 

    If hiring a vendor to make this, you're looking at between $3000-$4500 for this type of project.

    Resources: 2 cameras, one needs to be able to film 120fps slow-mo. A gimbel. Some cheap lights. Good wireless lavalier microphone. And their time.  Feel free to ask more video questions: pan.harley@gmail.com 

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Jiyoung Lee
  • Icon for: J. Clark

    J. Clark

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 16, 2019 | 07:56 p.m.

    Very compelling program! Are you also tracking the impact of your program on the undergraduate mentors? 

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Jiyoung Lee
  • Icon for: Jiyoung Lee

    Jiyoung Lee

    Lead Presenter
    May 17, 2019 | 02:57 p.m.

    Thank you for your comment, J. 

    We do interviews with graduating STUDIO mentors, and keep in touch with them through social media (facebook alumni group), and personal email addresses. We also send surveys outs to ask how graduated mentors are doing. Most of them are currently in graduate school or medical school. 

  • Icon for: Edith Graf

    Edith Graf

    Researcher
    May 17, 2019 | 08:07 p.m.

    I really enjoyed this video, the experience must be rewarding for all involved--the youth, the mentors, and the curriculum designers. I was wondering if you could speak to how input and innovation on the part of the youth feeds back into the curriculum design?

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Jiyoung Lee
  • Icon for: Jiyoung Lee

    Jiyoung Lee

    Lead Presenter
    May 20, 2019 | 02:50 p.m.

    Over the past couple of years, we have used survey on paper to ask youth if there were particular areas of STEM that they wanted to explore. Some responses include coding, creating animation, and general responses like hands-on activities, and games. We brought in outside instructor from code.org to support kids to build games, and used in-house resources to do drawing, and voice over animations.  

    Recently, we are supporting high school students to plan a workshop on social emotional learning in youth conference for middle school. We started by asking High school students to identify issues and topics that they find compelling to talk with middle school youth about. Adults (mentors, reserachers, and NH staff) took notes while they shared their thoughts (e.g. transition is hard, being unaware of emotions and having difficulty handling anger and frustration), and prepare activities that can support them to connect their wonderful insights into concrete activities by modeling what those activities can be. Then, youth give us feedback so that we can either improve the activity or modify so that it fits their purpose. This would be an example of a small scale practical curriculum design feedback loop. 

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Edith Graf
  • May 20, 2019 | 07:52 a.m.

    This combination of in-person mentoring and technology exploration is very powerful. Is there an element of this initiative to provide education/career pathways related to STEM? 

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Jiyoung Lee
  • Icon for: Jiyoung Lee

    Jiyoung Lee

    Lead Presenter
    May 20, 2019 | 02:59 p.m.

    Thank you for your question! I also really enjoyed your video on Digital Forensics! We have actually invited forensic scientist working in Washington to talk to the youth before. 

    We have had curriculum that specifically dedicated to health science careers (we had a lot of girls interested in the field of medicine) so that we could let youth know about varieties of professions other than doctors and nurses. 
    Another way that we address future career and academic pathway is via mentor Tedtalks. During these talks, undergraduate mentors talk about the schools, and activities that they did to help them get to universities, lab experiences, and what they are planning to do after they graduate. I think youth appreciates the talks because these stories are not too distant, and relatable to where they are now.  

  • Icon for: Brian Drayton

    Brian Drayton

    Researcher
    May 20, 2019 | 08:37 a.m.

    Very interested by the use of mapping in this kind of collaborative engagement with cityscapes.  Have you tried mobile apps like Track Kit (the only one i've played with), or does it work better for them to actually inscribe their pathways and then transfer to digital representation? 

     
    1
    Discussion is closed. Upvoting is no longer available

    Jiyoung Lee
  • Icon for: Jiyoung Lee

    Jiyoung Lee

    Lead Presenter
    May 20, 2019 | 03:01 p.m.

    We have used Siftr by field day and google earth when Erin ran VR mobile city science curriculum. It was really cool to collaborate in the space like Siftr and generated a lot of conversations about how different people focused on different spots and structures in the space in community. However, Erin will be a better person to answer this question! 

  • Further posting is closed as the showcase has ended.