1. Anne Leonhardt
  2. Associate Professor
  3. The Cultural History of Digital Technologies
  4. CUNY
  1. Satyanand Singh
  2. Associate Professor
  3. The Cultural History of Digital Technologies
  4. CUNY
Public Discussion
  • Icon for: Alex Rudolph

    Alex Rudolph

    Facilitator
    May 13, 2019 | 09:22 p.m.

    This is an intriguing project. I would have liked to have learned more details about how you engage the students with the ideas of fractals and how they impact their work as architects and engineers. Also, can you explain how you test that students comprehension of mathematical algorithms is improved by your program?

     
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    Satyanand Singh
  • Icon for: Satyanand Singh

    Satyanand Singh

    Co-Presenter
    May 13, 2019 | 11:02 p.m.

    Many of our students are involved in research projects and for us fractals and architectural forms were enticing to them. We have been beta-testing this project for curriculum modules that are being launched shortly.  We found that students were drawn to the beauty of fractals and this made it easy for us to relate the work to their interests. We pointed out applications of fractal geometry in computer graphics, biological sciences and astrophysics to name a few which garnered student interest. The architecture students were driven by the shapes and forms and related it to their work while the engineering students were interested in optimization. We grouped architecture and engineering students together and an interesting dynamic occurred in that the architects took the lead in the shapes while the engineers were driven to code, but eventually the lines were blurred with all students working towards the success of their project. Students were given the opportunity to print their fractals in 3D and test their predictions. We saw their code became more precise, programs were more adaptable and the run time decreased when generating 3D objects.  We felt this is due in part to their increased comprehension of algorithms.

     

     
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    Samantha Godsey
    Satyanand Singh
  • Icon for: Patricia Marsteller

    Patricia Marsteller

    Facilitator
    May 14, 2019 | 12:44 p.m.

    Intriguing.  I wonder too how projects could be incoporated into other undergrad math courses?

    Love the images and I think you might incorporate in maker spaces?

    You might find these resources helpful

     

        Search Results Web results [PDF] A Research Agenda for Academic Makerspaces - EECS at UC Berkeley
    https://people.eecs.berkeley.edu/~bjoern/papers...   by B Hartmann - ‎Related articles A key characteristic of academic makerspaces that distin- guishes them from .... The number of undergraduate makerspace students who were involved in the ... Making Makerspaces – MIT Project Manus
    https://project-manus.mit.edu/making-makerspaces     We'll also cover fundamental principles of successful makerspaces: ... He is cofounder/organizer of one of the largest undergraduate invention competitions in ...   [PDF] A Review of University Maker Spaces - SMARTech - Georgia Tech
    https://smartech.gatech.edu/.../1853/.../a_revi...?...     by T Barrett - ‎2015 - ‎Cited by 66 - ‎Related articles the skills that are currently being underdeveloped. Maker spaces go beyond the traditional machine shop environment familiar to the undergraduate curriculum ...
     
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    Satyanand Singh
  • Icon for: Stephen Alkins

    Stephen Alkins

    Facilitator
    May 14, 2019 | 02:19 p.m.

    Interesting project!

    Along the lines of incorporating this into different learning environments, have you thought about "scalability" of this, and what type of professional development would you need for facilitators?  Also, what level of programming do beginners need in order to take full advantage of this program?  While architecture and engineering students seemed to fall into their niches, did you find that students overall gained a greater understanding and comfort with coding?

     
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    Satyanand Singh
  • May 15, 2019 | 10:44 a.m.

    I learned something new today, thank you!  The Shepard Tone is fascinating, of course so is 3D printing of fractals.  I'll be back to digest more of your video.  Intriguing work!

     
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    Satyanand Singh
  • Icon for: Xiaona Zhou

    Xiaona Zhou

    Undergraduate Student
    May 15, 2019 | 04:34 p.m.

    Very informative and interesting video. Fractal is a such fascinating topic. As a student, I would like to learn more about it.

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    Ana Delgado

    K-12 Teacher
    May 15, 2019 | 07:14 p.m.

    Wow. Fractals are awesome! Connecting our work/learning to history and the natural world is always engaging and inspiring. What a great motivator for students (both formal and informal) in these fields!

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    Ann Delilkan

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 15, 2019 | 07:34 p.m.

    Have always LOVED fractals! What a great way to draw students in who probably (oh dear!) grew up watching ice crack in Frozen and would be intrigued to learn the mathematics behind the patterns that might have mesmerized them.

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    Ann Delilkan

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 15, 2019 | 07:34 p.m.

    Have always LOVED fractals! What a great way to draw students in who probably (oh dear!) grew up watching ice crack in Frozen and would be intrigued to learn the mathematics behind the patterns that might have mesmerized them.

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    Jonas Reitz

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 15, 2019 | 09:49 p.m.

    What a great project!  I love the idea of exploring fractals from many perspectives - theory, computation, and physical objects.  Also, I want to play with some of these 3d prints!

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    Jonas Reitz

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 15, 2019 | 09:50 p.m.

    What a great project!  I love the idea of exploring fractals from many perspectives - theory, computation, and physical objects.  Also, I want to play with some of these 3d prints!

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    Jonathan Natov

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 16, 2019 | 10:28 a.m.

    Interesting project. Too often we fall into the narrow confines of an academic specialty; we forget that it is the ideas and quest for understanding that motivates. This multi disciplinary approach brings out the beauty of fractals, and inspires us to learn more.

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    Jonathan Natov

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 16, 2019 | 10:28 a.m.

    Interesting project. Too often we fall into the narrow confines of an academic specialty; we forget that it is the ideas and quest for understanding that motivates. This multi disciplinary approach brings out the beauty of fractals, and inspires us to learn more.

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    Justin Vazquez-Poritz

    Higher Ed Administrator
    May 19, 2019 | 12:48 p.m.

    The connections with natural formations is intriguing and seems like a fantastic way to get students interested and aware that math is all around them.

    Not exactly fractals but some of you might be interested in this:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/05/17/science/math-physics-knitting-matsumoto.html?smid=nytcore-ios-share

  • Small default profile

    Justin Vazquez-Poritz

    Higher Ed Administrator
    May 19, 2019 | 12:48 p.m.

    The connections with natural formations is intriguing and seems like a fantastic way to get students interested and aware that math is all around them.

    Not exactly fractals but some of you might be interested in this:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/05/17/science/math-physics-knitting-matsumoto.html?smid=nytcore-ios-share

  • Further posting is closed as the showcase has ended.